London

Winston Churchill's Blitz bunker to be opened to public

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Media captionDown Street in Mayfair operated as a station from 1907 to 1932

A disused Tube station where Winston Churchill took refuge during the Blitz is among several London Underground sites to be opened to the public.

Down Street in Mayfair, a station from 1907 to 1932, was used as a bomb-proof bunker for the prime minister during World War Two.

Passageways under Euston Station and Clapham South's deep-level bomb shelter will also be made accessible.

Tours of the sites will be run by London Transport Museum.

Down Street was also used as the main location for coordinating the country's railways.

Image copyright London Transport Museum
Image caption Down Street's tunnels are being opened to the public
Image copyright London Transport Museum
Image caption The former Down Street station became a bunker for Prime Minister Winston Churchill during World War Two
Image caption Signs remain on the walls of Down Street station from its time as a bunker
Image copyright AFP/Getty Images
Image caption Winston Churchill secretly took refuge in the station during the Blitz

Tours will also take place in the warren of tunnels 180 steps beneath Clapham South.

The site was used as a shelter during the Blitz, as a base for Caribbean migrants arriving in 1948, and even by visitors to the Festival of Britain in 1951.

Image copyright London Tranposrt Museum
Image caption Clapham South was used as a site to register Caribbean migrants who came to Britain
Image copyright London Transport Museum
Image caption Clapham South station will be opened to the public as part of the London Transport Museum project
Image copyright London Transport Museum
Image caption Clapham South station was also used as a shelter during World War Two
Image copyright London Transport Museum
Image caption Visitors will be able to explore the tunnels at Clapham South station
Image copyright London Transport Museum
Image caption Clapham South
Image copyright London Transport Museum
Image caption Clapham South was used as an air raid shelter during World War Two

London Underground's former headquarters at 55 Broadway near St James' Park, which opened in 1929, will be another site featured in the Hidden London project.

Chris Nix of London Transport Museum said visitors would get "a rare opportunity to see a secret side of London".

Tickets for the tours, which will begin next month, go on sale on 20 April.

Image copyright TFL
Image caption The Art Deco building at 55 Broadway is described as the capital's first skyscraper
Image copyright London Transport Museum
Image caption 55 Broadway will be open to the public as part of the Hidden London project
Image copyright London Transport Museum
Image caption The Art Deco building is London Underground's former headquarters
Image copyright London Transport Museum
Image caption The view from the top of 55 Broadway
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Media captionAlice Bhandhukravi visited the warren of Tunnels beneath Clapham South

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