London

London coroner urges 'slippery' cycle superhighway review

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Media captionCycle Superhighways were introduced in London in 2010

A coroner has called for an urgent review of London's "slippery" cycle superhighways (CSH), saying they may pose a death risk to users.

Fiona Wilcox is investigating the death of a motorcyclist who crashed while riding on a wet CSH in Battersea, The London Evening Standard reports.

Some riders claim there is less grip on the road surface because of the type of paint used to demarcate the CSH.

Transport for London (TfL) has yet to respond to Dr Wilcox's concerns.

CSHs were introduced by Conservative mayor Boris Johnson in central London in 2015 and the first to open was a 1.4km (0.8mile) stretch between Oval and Pimlico.

They can be wholly or partially segregated lanes or part of the normal road, painted blue.

Future deaths risk

A collision investigator said Milan Dokic lost control of the motorcycle upon entering the CSH to overtake a van on Battersea Park Road on 1 March, 2016.

CCTV shows the motorcycle losing grip and sliding along the road, causing the rider to come off and hit a bollard.

While no conclusion has been reached about the cause of death, the pre-inquest review on 14 February heard the CSH road surface at the crash site had lower skid resistance than normal road surfaces and those close to pedestrian crossings.

In her pre-inquest review report, Dr Wilcox said: "In my opinion there is a risk that future deaths will occur unless action is taken."

She concluded the risk was too high for TfL to delay action until the conclusion of the full inquest hearing in the summer.

Leon Daniels, TfL's director of surface transport, said: "Our thoughts are with the family and friends of Milan Dokic.

"We're preparing our response to the coroner and carefully considering the issues raised. We are confident our cycle superhighway network is improving the safety of London's roads."

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