Manchester

Trafficked women in Manchester 'a family firm'

Manchester Crown Court
Image caption The men are on trial at Manchester Crown Court

A father and son ran a family business trafficking women who were then raped and forced to work as prostitutes in Manchester, a court has heard.

Romanians Bogdan and Marius Nejloveanu promised their five victims homes and jobs but instead "beat and degraded" them, Manchester Crown Court heard.

The pair targeted the Romanian women, aged 19 to 27, because they were young or vulnerable, the jury heard.

Both men have denied 33 separate charges, including trafficking.

Rachel Smith, opening the case for the prosecution, told the jury they would hear testimony from some of the women about how they were forced to work as prostitutes.

"They will also tell you of the violence they suffered at the hands of Marius Nejloveanu if they refused to bend to his will," she said.

"Most of them were raped by him, some were subjected to the most extreme physical and sexual violence and sexual humiliation."

The court was told that the five women were specifically trafficked into the UK by Bogdan Nejloveanu, 51, for the benefit of his 23-year-old son.

"You may conclude that the son learnt this trade from his father and that this was a family business," Miss Smith added.

"The sole purpose of the business was to provide Marius Nejloveanu and the wider Nejloveanu family with a significant income stream far in excess that they could have earned by going out to work themselves or employed legitimately in the UK or Romania, an income derived solely from the exploitation of women under their control."

Marius Nejloveanu faces six counts of rape, nine counts of trafficking, assault, controlling prostitution for gain, causing sexual activity without consent and conspiracy to pervert the course of justice.

His father is accused of trafficking, controlling prostitution for gain, assault and conspiracy to pervert the course of justice.

All of the alleged offences took place between 2006 and 2010.

The trial, scheduled to last six weeks, was adjourned until Thursday.

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