Manchester

Primary teacher Gary Ellins filmed pupils undressing

Gary Ellins Image copyright GMP
Image caption The judge said Gary Ellins showed "a breathtaking breach of trust"

A primary school teacher who secretly filmed pupils undressing, showed a "breathtaking breach of trust," a judge has said.

Gary Ellins, 45, was jailed for 12 months at Manchester Crown Court after admitting offences of voyeurism and possessing indecent images of children.

Ellins, formerly of Vernon Drive, Marple, was caught when police searched his father's home in November.

Michelle Brown, defending, said Ellins recognised his need for treatment.

The court heard police seized pen drives and computer hard drives belonging to Ellins, which had two videos of children, some as young as eight, together with images of naked, pre-pubescent girls.

His father Jerry has also admitted separate offences involving indecent images of children and will be sentenced later this month, the court was told.

'Calculated' filming

Ellins, who qualified as a teacher eight years ago after a career in commerce and property, committed the offences between 2010 and 2012 in his first teaching job at Micklehurst All Saints CE Primary School in Mossley, Tameside.

The court heard he installed a static camera via a laptop webcam to capture two classes who were getting changed for PE lessons.

Judge Martin Rudland told him: "The images clearly show you in a calculated way setting the camera up and leaving the room while the children in your care quite innocently and happily were allowed to change to prepare for gym class.

"So it was for your own personal sexual gratification you were able to obtain images in that way in a complete and breathtaking breach of trust placed in you, not only by the parents of those children but also your employers."

Ellins received eight-month jail terms, to run concurrently, for two counts of voyeurism, and four months for six counts of possessing Category C indecent images of children.

He will remain on the Sex Offenders Register for 10 years.

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