Residents back plan for £260m Anfield regeneration

Anfield Around 300 properties will be removed to make way for the planned regeneration

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More than 80% of people living and working in the Anfield area of Liverpool are backing plans for a £260m regeneration, according to a survey.

About 1,700 people were asked for their opinions on proposals which were unveiled in June.

They involved new housing, a business hub and expansion of Liverpool FC's stadium, creating up to 700 jobs.

Mayor Joe Anderson previously said it was "shameful" there had been years of delays to improving the area.

'Improve lives'

The plans, drawn up by a consortium made up of Liverpool City Council, housing providers and Liverpool FC, would also see the creation of a wide avenue through Stanley Park ending in a new public square.

About 250 new homes would be built, with 296 removed to make way, and a 100-bed hotel constructed.

Feedback from residents during a six-week community engagement project will now be considered as more detailed plans are drawn up.

They will be subject to consultation before planning applications are submitted next year.

Mr Anderson said: "People have given us invaluable information about the entire range of regeneration ideas and concepts which we unveiled.

"In the coming weeks we will use this information to refine our proposals and to undertake another listening and consultation exercise.

"We believe the plans are exciting and will deliver a massive improvement in quality of life for many thousands of people and be of major benefit to the city, not just Anfield."

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