Liverpool

Liverpool memorial stone for Victoria Cross hero Albert White

Memorial stone for Albert White Image copyright Liverpool City Council
Image caption The former sergeant in the South Wales Borderers served at Gallipoli, where his battalion lost almost 1,600 men.

A World War One hero who survived the Battle of the Somme has been honoured with a commemorative stone, a century after he was killed.

Albert White, 25, was killed in France after storming an enemy machine gun post in order to save his comrades.

The Liverpool-born sergeant was awarded the Victoria Cross for his "conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty".

A stone has been laid at Liverpool Parish Church, one hundred years after he died in May 1917.

Tom White, the soldier's great nephew, was present during Friday's ceremony alongside veterans and serving soldiers.

He said: "All the family have always known about Albert's heroism. It's been fantastic today and very emotional, because it's been a real focal point for the family to get together, to come together to give Albert due recognition."

Image copyright Liverpool City Council
Image caption Albert White was killed trying to storm an enemy machine gun post in order to save his comrades

The former sergeant in the South Wales Borderers served at Gallipoli, where his battalion lost almost 1,600 men.

He was then posted to France where he survived the opening day of the Battle of the Somme and many other battles.

He was killed at Monchy-le-Preux during the Battle of Arras.

His citation in the London Gazette reads: "Realising during an attack that one of the enemy's machine guns, which had previously been located, would probably hold up the whole advance of his company, Sgt White, without the slightest hesitation, and regardless of all personal danger, dashed ahead of his company to capture the gun.

"When within a few yards of the gun, he fell riddled with bullets having thus willingly sacrificed his life in order that he might secure the success of the operations and the welfare of his comrades."

Liverpool's Lord Mayor Roz Gladden said the stone would be a permanent reminder of the "incredible contribution" Sgt White made.

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