Driver spotted using two mobile phones is banned

David Secker was passing on a phone number to a friend

A man spotted using two mobile phones while behind the wheel of his car has been banned from driving for 12 months.

Norwich magistrates heard David Secker, 34, was seen talking on one phone while holding the other as if texting.

Secker, who is unemployed, did not appear to be holding the steering wheel when he was spotted on the 70mph A47 at Blofield, near Norwich on 17 May.

He was sentenced after last month being convicted of using a mobile phone while driving and having no insurance.

Secker, of Rimington Road, Sprowston, near Norwich, was also fined £150 and his licence was endorsed with 14 penalty points.

His solicitor Simon Nicholls told the court his client had been holding the second phone to read out a telephone number with his hand on the wheel and that he was not, as has been reported in the press, using his knees to drive his M-registration Vauxhall Tigra.

'Fairly treated'

The court heard that when officers pulled Secker over, they had to wait for him to finish his phone conversation.

Prosecutor Denis King said: "He was seen holding a mobile phone to his right ear and as he moved closer the officer saw he was holding another phone in his other hand as though he was texting."

Secker had been found guilty in his absence of using a mobile phone while driving, having no insurance and not being in a position to have proper control.

Outside court, Secker said: "I think the magistrates treated me fairly."

Mr Nicholls said: "We hear about people driving while eating apples and doing all kind of stupid things.

"He accepts he made a mistake and will learn from it."

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