Fye Bridge: £3,000 repair after Norfolk Police car crash

Police car crashing through roadside bollards on Fye Bridge Police said it appeared "a second's inattentiveness" led to the Fye Bridge crash

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A row of six bollards destroyed when a Norfolk Police car driven by an officer with "fatigue" crashed through them, have cost nearly £3,000 to replace.

The crash demolished the posts near Fye Bridge, Norwich, in May 2012. Repairs took 10 months to complete.

The police report into the incident said "it would appear a second's inattentiveness on behalf of the officer through fatigue" was to blame.

The repair costs will not affect "frontline policing" said the force.

The damaged police car was written off as it was "beyond economic repair", added the police spokesperson.

The officer involved in the crash who "received management action as a result of the investigation" has not been named.

Work 'delayed'

The repair work involved replacing six bollards, an area of paving around the damaged posts and ensuring there was no damage to the bridge structure.

Replacement bollards on Fye Bridge The replacement work was delayed as the bollards are no longer "off the peg"

A Norwich City Council spokesperson said: "These bollards are not now available off the peg and this delayed the work.

"When the bollards arrived, the worst of the winter weather hit and as that cleared up the maintenance crews were tied up filling many urgent potholes around the city.

"Norfolk's Constabulary's Fleet Unit has been informed and will be invoiced imminently for the sum of £2,949.44 plus VAT."

CCTV footage of the crash, which happened outside the Ribs of Beef pub, was posted on YouTube and has been viewed more than 80,000 times.

The details of the police report was obtained by a BBC Freedom of Information Act request.

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