Hucknall Town sells virtual tickets to stay afloat

Hucknall Town FC's Liz Morley and Tony Knowles Hucknall Town FC's Liz Morley and Tony Knowles say they are doing their best to save the club

A struggling non-league football club is selling "virtual tickets" to people who will not attend matches in a desperate bid to stay open.

Hucknall Town, in Nottinghamshire, has an average attendance of 140 and needs to find £30,000 to keep playing.

Fans who buy the ex-colliery club's £5 and £10 online tickets get a mention on its website. Businesses can buy £500 corporate virtual tickets.

Acting chief executive Liz Morley said she was optimistic of saving the club.

'Incredibly loyal'

The team, nicknamed the Yellows, was established in 1943 and has been known as a family-friendly place since.

But it said it has struggled in the past 18 months and is appealing for community support to pay off debts.

It was left with a £50,000 tax bill in 2011 but managed to pay off almost half of the debt and has now set itself the target of £30,000.

Ms Morley said: "We are always optimistic at Hucknall Town. We will find a way. We will keep battling on, we've been battling for the last 18 months.

"We've got to carry on - the club means an awful lot to an awful lot of people locally.

"The 140 people that do come to support us are incredibly loyal to the club and it's really for them that we are trying everything in our power to keep it open."

Its Watnall Road ground has a capacity of 3,000, with a record attendance in recent years being about 1,800 at FA Trophy games.

More on This Story

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

BBC Nottingham

Weather

Nottingham

13 °C 7 °C

Features & Analysis

Elsewhere on the BBC

  • MoviesMovie magic

    Tech that reads your desires is helping to increase your odds of producing a hit film, says BBC Future

Programmes

  • Ade Adepitan at the ColosseumThe Travel Show Watch

    The challenge of providing disabled access at Europe’s leading ancient monuments

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.