Lindsey Inger death: Moor Bridge rail and tram footbridge built

Lindsey Inger Lindsey Inger was the third person to be accidentally killed at Moor Bridge

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A footbridge has been built over a rail and tram crossing where three people have been killed.

Relatives and friends of 13-year-old Lindsey Inger, who was killed by a tram in November, have campaigned for it.

Lindsey's foster mother said she was glad the bridge had finally been installed, but said it was too late to save her daughter's life.

A woman and her grandson were killed at the Moor Bridge crossing, in Nottinghamshire, in 2008.

Marlene Starling, Lindsey's foster mother, said: "If you see something and it's a danger you are going to make it so it's safe, so why have we had to lose all these lives before they've done it?

"But we are thankful now that they have anyway, so we are hoping and praying nobody's going to lose any more lives."

Moor Bridge crossing in Nottinghamshire Lindsey Inger's family and friends campaigned for the footbridge

The Transport Salaried Staffs' Association (TSSA) union has accused Network Rail and the Office of Rail Regulation (ORR) of ignoring safety warnings 14 months before Lindsey was killed.

Network Rail said it had closed hundreds of level crossings because it recognised they can be dangerous, and safety features had been introduced at thousands of level crossings.

The ORR said it was pushing for the closure of level crossings where possible.

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