Nottingham

Children's care homes abuse claims increase to 13

Beechwood Children's Home
Image caption Beechwood Children's Home was run by the county and city councils and closed in 2008

An investigation into abuse at a children's care home has been widened to include other establishments.

In May it was revealed 26 former residents of the Beechwood home in Mapperley, Nottingham, had been awarded a total of £250,000 in compensation.

The city council said the claims were settled without an admission of liability but confirmed there were a "significant number" of other claims.

Now it has emerged these relate to 12 other care homes and secure units.

In 2010 Nottinghamshire Police launched Operation Daybreak, an investigation into allegations of abuse at Beechwood from the 1960s to 2000.

By last year this had widened to include four other homes in Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire.

Now Nottingham City Council has confirmed compensation claims have been received in relation to 13 centres.

Nottinghamshire Police said it was actively investigating five homes with another four facing no further action.

The disclosures follow a BBC Freedom of Information request.

Officers also confirmed 10 men had been arrested with seven released with no further action; two on bail and still being investigated on suspicion of rape and that one man had since died during its investigation over rape allegations.


Homes under scrutiny

  • Beechwood, Mapperley, Nottingham*+
  • Bracken House, Bulwell, Nottingham*+
  • Wood Nook, Beechdale, Nottingham*
  • Risley Hall, Derbyshire*
  • Amberdale, Stapleford*
  • Brick House, Radcliffe-on-Trent*
  • Forest Lodge, Hyson Green, Nottingham*
  • Greencroft, Clifton*
  • Laybrook, Mansfield*
  • Red Tiles, Bulwell*
  • Skegby Hall, Sutton-in-Ashfield*
  • Sycamore House, Sherwood, Nottingham*+
  • Wollaton House, Wollaton, Nottingham*+
  • Hazelwood, Nottingham+

(Key: *Compensation claims, +Under police investigation)


Former resident Mickey Summers is at the centre of a campaign to reveal what went on. He has already been told his records were destroyed in the late 1970s.

He said: "I feel disgusted and let down. I believe the police weren't interested. It's the same old thing, they think a little boy crying wolf and associate kids in children's homes with attention seeking.

"I feel like they've abused me for the last 10 years. I want someone made accountable. I don't care if individuals are deceased. Make someone corporately accountable. It's about justice and getting final closure."

Mr Summers complained to Nottinghamshire Police more than a decade ago but claims he was not taken seriously - a decision which will be reviewed by the Independent Police Complaints Commission.

A city council spokesman said they were trying to help Mr Summers get to the truth and had conducted an extensive search for his records and their destruction was due to the lack of rules on keeping files at the time.

But they said they had apologised and were still trying to help him piece together what happened.

More on this story

Related Internet links

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites