Nottingham

Quidditch tournament held in 'Batman's garden'

Harry Potter fans watch the quidditch players at Wollaton Park Image copyright University of Nottingham
Image caption Many Harry Potter fans watched the quidditch tournament at Wollaton Park

Hundreds of players have competed in the UK's biggest ever quidditch tournament, playing a sport adapted from the Harry Potter books.

Wollaton Hall and Park in Nottingham, known for being used as Wayne Manor in a Batman film, was chosen to host the second British Quidditch Cup (BQC).

Organisers hope the public location has helped raise the profile of the sport.

Quidditch players do not fly as they do in Harry Potter, but they do run around with broomsticks between their legs.

Sixteen teams competed when the British Quidditch Cup was first held in Oxford in November 2013, and 23 teams have competed this time.

'Kicked in the head'

QuidditchUK president Amy Maidment said: "We want people to discover what we do and see us as a legitimate sport rather than imitating Harry Potter, so we put it in a public place to get that exposure."

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Media captionThe BBC's Mike Bushell explains how Quidditch is played

Ms Maidment has previously played for Nottingham Nightmares, a team from the University of Nottingham.

She initially became interested because of her love for Harry Potter, but now sees the sport as separate from the books.

"It's like rugby mixed with dodgeball," she said.

"There are a few injuries but we are currently working on re-evaluating the rules to minimise that, because if the injury rates continue as they are people aren't going to carry on wanting to play it.

"I haven't had a bad injury apart from a concussion. I got accidentally kicked in the head by my captain."

Radcliffe Chimeras, from Oxford University, were favourites to win the competition, due to end at about 18:30 GMT.

Image copyright Dan Basnett
Image caption Players do not fly as they do in Harry Potter, but the broomsticks between their legs act as a handicap
Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Quidditch, sometimes called "muggle quidditch", has been adapted from Harry Potter books

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