Nottingham

Ferret scout car unveiled at Nottinghamshire Military Museum

Ferret scout car
Image caption The Ferret scout car was given by Lady Rozelle Raynes to her husband Richard as a birthday present

An armoured vehicle used by the British Army in the 20th Century has been unveiled at a military museum.

The Ferret scout car given by Lady Rozelle Raynes to her husband Richard as a birthday present in 1999, was donated to the Queen's Royal Lancers and Nottinghamshire Yeomanry (QRLNY) museum after she died in 2015.

It is now on display at Thoresby Courtyard, once owned by Lady Rozelle.

The vehicles, which were made by Daimler, were used from the 1950s.

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Image caption The Ferret scout car is now on display at Thoresby Courtyard, outside the Queen's Royal Lancers and Nottinghamshire Yeomanry museum
Image caption The QRLNY museum hopes the donation of the Ferret scout car will attract more visitors

QRLNY curator Captain Mick Holtby, who drove a Ferret during active service and was put on the insurance of the Raynes' vehicle by Dr Hollings Raynes, said the museum was "very pleased" to display the car.

"Without the help of Lady Rozelle Raynes we wouldn't have had the museum established here in the first place," he said.

"It's a good talking point for people coming into the archway."

Image caption Made by Daimler, the Ferret scout car was used in the latter half of the 20th Century by the British Army
Image caption The Ferret scout car now on display was a birthday present to Richard Hollings Raynes, seen here in a family album

Hugh Matheson, who inherited the Thoresby Hall estate from Lady Rozelle, attended Wednesday's unveiling of the vehicle.

With Lady Rozelle having served as a stoker during World War Two and having met soldiers who trained on the estate, he said the Ferret car would attract more visitors to the Thoresby Hall estate to the museum.

"They walk into the courtyard, and you see visitors who've no idea about anything just look across, light up [and] go and have a look at it," he said.

"It's an extraordinary draw, and we're really really pleased that they've got it."

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