Baby blown into Watchet Harbour water by gust of wind

George Reeder George Reeder jumped in and saved the baby

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A baby boy has been rescued by fishermen and a marina dock master after his pushchair was blown into the water by a gust of wind, police said.

The six-month-old was swept into the water at Watchet Harbour, Somerset, at 08:00 GMT on Sunday.

Avon and Somerset Police said he was airlifted to hospital for treatment.

A force spokesman said the condition of the baby was no longer believed to be life-threatening.

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The poor mother, she'll probably never get over something like that, it's your worst nightmare”

End Quote George Reeder Eyewitness

Dock master George Reeder said he dashed to the water's edge after hearing screaming and saw the child's upturned pushchair in the water.

The 63-year-old said: "The mother was there and she said 'my baby has gone in the water', so I went to the edge and I could see the pushchair upside down, floating away.

"I just jumped in and pulled the pushchair back over to the edge of the quay and then somebody put a rope down and I tied it on and they lifted it out.

"As far as I know, what the police told me was that the wind blew the buggy in."

He added: "The baby was still in the pushchair, it was very cold, it is amazing really because he must have been in there for a good five minutes under the water.

"They pulled up the pushchair and a lady started doing CPR, and then the Coastguard came, and the ambulance and the police, so I backed out the way."

Mr Reeder said the child's grandfather told him later that he was out of intensive care.

He said: "The poor mother, she'll probably never get over something like that, it's your worst nightmare."

A police spokesman said: "It is believed a gust of wind blew the buggy with the child in it into the water."

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