Stoke & Staffordshire

Potteries pyramid costing £100,000 is set to be moved

Potteries Pyramid
Image caption The Potteries Pyramid currently stands on a hill at the northern approaches to the city

A piece of public art in Stoke-on-Trent costing around £100,000 was put in the wrong place, according to the city council.

More than four years ago, the Potteries Pyramid was erected on a hill in Chatterley Valley, near Tunstall.

Now the authority wants to move the sculpture onto a roundabout not far from its current location.

A new piece of art - twice the size of the pyramid - has now been commissioned for the hill.

Paul Bailey, from Stoke-on-Trent City Council, said: "The problem with the site is that it's not easily accessible and it's not very visible from the main road.

"I think in hindsight, it probably was [a mistake] although I can understand why the site was originally chosen.

"The structure was always meant to be seen from a 360-degree viewpoint."

A roundabout on Reginald Mitchell Way - the main road that runs beside the sculpture - is thought to be the favoured option.

'Bogged down in bureaucracy'

The three-sided, metal sculpture is 10 metres tall and was designed and created by south Cheshire artist Ondre Nowakowski.

Mr Nowakowski said the original site for the pyramid was changed three times and that he was disappointed with its current location.

"It just got bogged down in bureaucracy. It's never been launched and in my opinion, never been completed.

"If it finally gets resolved and the piece starts to look as it should - and in a place where it's not going to be neglected and abused - that would be great."

The council has now been given around £130,000 and a new commission for the hill has been awarded to Wolfgang Buttress, who is renowned for working with public spaces.

The new piece of art is expected to be much bigger so it can be seen better from the road. Mr Bailey pledged that the new sculpture and the area surrounding it would be better managed.

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