Sussex

NHS 'failed' man accused of Donald Lock A24 roadside murder, court hears

Donald Lock
Image caption Donald Lock, 79, was a retired solicitor who had been driving back from a cycling meeting

A mental health trust admitted failing a man accused of murdering a motorist by stabbing him 39 times on a road in West Sussex, a court has heard.

Matthew Daley, 35, denies murder but has admitted attacking 79-year-old retired solicitor Donald Lock claiming diminished responsibility.

Mr Daley's father told doctors without proper care, his son would "hurt someone or worse", the jury was told.

Mr Lock was killed while driving on the A24 at Findon, near Worthing last July.

Defence counsel David Howker QC said Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust apologised to Mr Daley's family for having "failed" him in his care and treatment.

Relatives were "constantly on the case" of clinicians for a "thorough diagnosis" of Mr Daley's mental condition, Mr Howker told Lewes Crown Court.

Image copyright Eddie Mitchell
Image caption Matthew Daley is charged with murder and possessing a knife in a public place

Philip Bennetts QC, for the prosecution, said it was for the jury to decide on the mental state of the defendant.

He said Mr Daley, formerly of St Elmo Road, Worthing "braked violently while approaching the junction".

"Donald Lock, who was immediately behind him, collided with his car."

He said that when Mr Lock asked why Mr Daley had stopped so suddenly he was violently attacked and stabbed.

The prosecution said Mr Lock repeatedly cried out "help, help" during the attack.

Witness Andrew Slater described a "frenzied" attack and how he tried to remonstrate with Mr Daley, but backed away when he saw his knife.

Mr Lock, who had recently been given the all-clear from prostate cancer, died at the scene.

The case continues.

Image caption Donald Lock had four grandchildren and five great-grandchildren

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