York & North Yorkshire

Group calls for 'notorious' A64 road improvements

A64
Image caption The A64 Growth Partnership wants improvements to cut congestion and journey times

Turning a "notorious" stretch of road in Yorkshire into a dual carriageway is critical for economic growth, a campaign group has said.

The A64 Growth Partnership wants improvements to the bottleneck route between York, Malton and Scarborough.

It claims the changes would deliver economic growth and address safety concerns.

Highways England said it was looking at improving the road.

Read more about this and other stories from across Yorkshire

The group, which is made up of business leaders and local authorities, said long-term investment, including further dual carriageway work, was needed.

Bill Bartlett, from McCain Foods GB Ltd, based in Scarborough, said: "Improving the infrastructure of the A64 is all about reliability, connectivity and accessibility.

"This investment is critical. Not just for our business, but for all businesses in the corridor between York and Scarborough."

Image copyright Google
Image caption Highways England is considering improvements to the road from the Hopgrove roundabout at York

The campaign is supported by the MPs for the area, including Kevin Hollinrake, Conservative MP for Thirsk and Malton.

"The A64 east of York is notorious across Yorkshire and beyond as a bottleneck and we can't tolerate this any longer," Mr Hollinrake said.

There are also concerns about the road's safety following recent double fatalities.

Highways England said it was developing a scheme for the A64 Hopgrove roundabout.

"As part of this work we have carried out a feasibility study to establish the case for a junction improvement," it said.

"We will now be exploring various options in detail at this location, which look at elements of junction improvements and dualling between York and Barton-le-Willows. These options will be developed further over the next few years."

Related Topics

More on this story

Related Internet links

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites