Peter Quinn says son will not return to Irish Republic

Peter Darragh Quinn Peter Darragh Quinn is the nephew of the bankrupt former billionaire, Sean Quinn

Peter Darragh Quinn's father has said his son will not be returning to the Irish Republic to face the prospect of jail.

Peter Quinn Senior said his son believes he has no chance of getting "fair play or justice".

Peter Darragh Quinn is the nephew of the bankrupt former billionaire, Sean Quinn.

He was sentenced to jail in his absence on 20 July after failing to turn up at a Dublin court.

Peter Darragh Quinn was due to be sentenced for contempt of court alongside his cousin, Sean Quinn Jr, who is now in prison.

He was pictured at a Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) match in Kinawley, County Fermanagh, last weekend, alongside his father.

Peter Quinn Senior told The Impartial Reporter he believes there is a conspiracy in the Irish Republic against his family and said that although his son is "under a lot of pressure", his family is fully behind his decision to stay in Northern Ireland.

The authorities in the Republic of Ireland cannot force Peter Darragh Quinn to serve his sentence if he has left their jurisdiction.

Last month, an Irish judge ruled that he, along with Sean Quinn Sr and Sean Quinn Jr, were in contempt after they put international property worth millions of pounds beyond the reach of the former Anglo Irish Bank.

An arrest warrant was issued for Peter Darragh Quinn on the day he failed to appear at the High Court in Dublin.

His lawyer told the court that his client was too ill to attend the sentencing, but shortly afterwards there were reports that he had returned to his home in Northern Ireland.

The former Anglo Irish Bank was bailed out by Irish taxpayers and is now controlled by the Irish Banking Resolution Company (IBRC).

The IBRC claims the Quinns owe it about £2bn and is trying to recover the money from their property assets on behalf of Irish taxpayers.

Sean Quinn Jr is serving an indefinite sentence in Dublin's Mountjoy Prison.

His father avoided jail but must co-operate with the IBRC within three months.

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