Northern Ireland

Newspaper review: True love and an unwelcome visitor

Ulster Star Image copyright Ulster Star
Lurgan Mail Image copyright Lurgan Mail
Tyrone Courier Image copyright Tyrone Courier
Newry Democrat Image copyright Newry Democrat
Impartial Reporter Image copyright Impartial Reporter

The Ulster Star leads with a topic which has caused a huge amount of controversy lately.

It reports on calls for designated scrambler areas following the tragic death of Lisburn man Ryan Phillips.

Mr Phillips died after he was involved in a collision involving two off-road motorbikes in February.

It has led to calls for a purpose-built off-road facility so the bikes may be ridden safely.

'Foul odour'

On a rather sour note - there's a smelly issue for residents of Ballymacash.

The paper reports locals are holding their noses because of a "foul sewage odour" on Ballymacash Road.

NI Water has said it is inspecting and investigating the problem.

'Not for sale'

The Lurgan Mail covers the protest against an alleged planned sale of land in Craigavon Park, with the headline: "Council is accused of arrogance over park".

The paper reports that about 200 residents and groups turned up at Craigavon Civic Centre on Monday evening to protest about what they say are plans to sell off 12 acres of Craigavon City Park land.

However, a council spokesperson told the paper there was no indication the site was for sale.

Image copyright AFP
Image caption A resident has complained to the council about a mouse they spotted

Those with a fear of rodents should look away now - the paper reports that some furry friends have taken up residence at a local supermarket in Lurgan.

It says environmental health officers are investigating a complaint made on 24 February about a mouse sighting at a well-known supermarket branch.

Weary heads

Some people choose a cruise, some like a little bling, but the Kennedys from Claudy celebrated 50 golden years of marriage with pillow talk.

They did not want gifts so they invited friends and family to give them money to be spent on a warm place for weary heads.

Derry Now reports the couple bought two guest beds for the Stroke Unit at Altnagelvin Hospital. In 2013, Mr Kennedy spent some time there and the guest beds were a thoughtful way of offering others a safe haven at a very difficult time.

The paper also reports on a plan to commemorate those who "are giving the gift of life". The local council has agreed to give their full support to the installation of a sculpture at St Columb's Park to remember organ donors.

Brain child

Newry Democrat leads with the "deliberate attack" on an Orange Hall - Altnaveigh Orange Hall in Martin's Lane was set on fire by vandals on Saturday evening.

It was attacked in 1996 and 2005, and a spokesperson for the organisation condemned it as a "truly sickening" incident.

Babies in Newry now have the opportunity to learn to communicate with signs, the paper reports.

It's the brain child of mum and teacher Katie Mayne, who is running classes teaching toddlers to sign their needs.

What's the sign for 'a cup of tea and a chocolate biscuit please?'

Cold feet

There is some consternation about the temperature of a swimming pool in County Fermanagh.

A young mother tells the Impartial Reporter that she brings her baby to a swimming pool in Omagh as the water at the Lakeland Forum is too cold.

A council spokesperson told the paper the temperature of the pool was checked four times a day and was in line with industry recommendations.

The council also said the water in the shallow end of the pool was maintained at more than 30C.

'Political tsunami'

In the run-up to the elections, the Tyrone Courier leads with an "electioneering row" at St Francis Primary School, Derrylatinee.

It says the school was at the "centre of a political tsunami" after envelopes containing a letter from Sinn Fein's Michelle Gildernew were given to pupils to give to their parents. .

The Council for Catholic Maintained Schools denied claims the school had been used for "electioneering".

It said its solicitor considered the documents were for the benefit of the school and Ms Gildernew's action was appropriate.

Sinn Féin said the letter, written on the party's headed notepaper, was part of a campaign for better broadband.