Northern Ireland

Attack 'won't change UK-Ireland travel'

Police in London
Image caption David Davis said the Common Travel Area (CTA) was not under threat.

The fact that one of the London attackers moved to the UK from Dublin should not alter existing travel arrangements between the UK and the Republic of Ireland, the Brexit secretary has said.

Rachid Redouane had not been known to police in the UK or in Ireland.

David Davis said the Common Travel Area (CTA) was not under threat.

He said Saturday's London Bridge attack should not "lead us to doubt the continuing existence of the CTA".

Mr Davis confirmed security arrangements were "a continuing matter of discussions between ourselves and the Irish government" - adding that they were always under review.

Image copyright London Metrolpolitan Police
Image caption Rachid Redouane was not known to the police in the UK or Ireland

Questioned on whether security was now the number one issue, he said: "Yes, probably".

Asked to give details on what steps might be put in place on the Irish border after the UK leaves the EU he said: "I am not going to go into security policy post Brexit at this stage.

"We are talking that over with the Irish government.

"We will come to a resolution which is in the interests of both governments."

Last month, EU chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier said there was "always an answer" to the issue of what form the Irish border would take after Brexit.

Image copyright PA
Image caption The UK and Irish governments both say they do not want a return to borders of the past

The UK and Irish governments have both said they do not want a return to customs posts on the border after the UK leaves the EU.

The EU's negotiating guidelines call for a "flexible and creative" approach to the customs issue.

Mr Davis said: "We will take some time to get a final outcome because it will have implications that arise out of the free trade agreement we have and the customs agreement we have."

The attack in London was the third terror attack in the UK in three months, following the car and knife attack on Westminster Bridge in March, in which five people were killed, and the Manchester bombing on 22 May, in which 22 people were killed.

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