Northern Ireland

Document reveals UK government's legacy plans

Image caption The 27-page document has been designed by a group called CHANGE for people with learning disabilities

The BBC has obtained a document which is part of the government's public consultation process on legacy.

The paper which is described as an 'Easy Read' version has been prepared by a disability group for the Northern Ireland Office.

It is written in plain language and is illustrated.

The paper gives the first glimpse of what the government's long awaited legacy consultation process will look like.

The 27-page document has been designed by a group called CHANGE for people with learning disabilities.

There is no mention of a statute of limitations which has caused so much controversy - neither is there any reference to funding for legacy inquests.

Groups detailed in the Stormont House Agreement are listed including the Historical Investigations Unit (HIU). It will work on Troubles related deaths.

The document states the group "would have policing powers to carry out criminal investigations ".

The report also says the unit "would likely have 1700 deaths to look into and would aim to complete their work in five years ".

There is also the Independent Commission on Information Retrieval (ICIR) which aims to help families find information about the deaths of relatives. ICIR would, according to the document, run for "five years and would have offices in the UK and Ireland ".

Image caption Last week local political parties were briefed on how the consultation process would work

The next body detailed in the document is the Oral History Archive.

It would collect recorded memories and stories about the Troubles in one place.

It would be set up by the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland.

The final group in the document is the Implementation and Reconciliation Group.

It aims to promote reconciliation and anti-sectarianism. The group will have 11 members representing the UK and Irish Governments and the five main political parties. It will report after five years.

There are other legacy actions being planned such as setting up a Mental Trauma Service and finding a way to support severely injured victims through a pension.

This document shows there is much for people to consider when it comes to the past.

The report does not detail when the consultation period will officially begin.

Last week the local political parties were briefed on how the consultation process would work. A number of documents were shared with politicians.

The Northern Ireland Office say they hope to officially announce the consultation period soon.

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