UK Politics

Landale online: The key moments in Cameron's speech

What were the key moments and themes of David Cameron's speech?

THE TOP LINE

Times are tough. But they will get better.

Trust me, David Cameron, to lead you to that better future. Leadership for a better future, geddit? And my leadership advice for you today is: pay off your credit card to help the debt crisis. Or don't because that would hurt the economy.

Either way, we will stick to our plans to cut the deficit. And we will try to encourage growth. To mix my metaphors, only by building the new foundations of our economic house can we turn this ship around.

THE ESSENTIAL ARGUMENT IN HIS OWN WORDS

Image caption Mr Cameron's themes writ large

"I don't for one minute underestimate how worried people feel."

"It is an anxious time."

"The threat to the world economy - and to Britain - is as serious today as it was in 2008 when world recession loomed."

"In these difficult times, it is leadership we need, to get our economy moving, to get our society working."

"Leadership works."

"People want to know why the good times are so long coming. The answer is straight forward but uncomfortable. This was no normal recession; we're in a debt crisis."

"Nobody wants false optimism. And I will never pretend there are short cuts to success."

"Borrowing to cut taxes or increase spending.... risks higher interest rates."

"The only way out of a debt crisis is to deal with your debts."

"Our plan is right. And our plan will work."

"This is a one-nation deficit reduction plan from a one-nation party."

"Right now we need to be energised, not paralysed by gloom and fear."

"Let's reject the pessimism. Let's bring on the can-do optimism."

HOW THAT CONTROVERSIAL CREDIT CARDS PARAGRAPH CHANGED

The original text briefed to journalists: "The only way out of a debt crisis is to deal with your debts. That means households - all of us - paying off the credit card and store card bills".

What he actually said: "The only way out of a debt crisis is to deal with your debts. That's why households are paying off the credit card and store card bills". Exhortation became description.

THOSE MIXED METAPHORS IN FULL

1. "The new economy we are building, it's like building a house. The most important part is the part you can't see - the foundations that make it stable. Slowly but surely we're laying the foundations for a better future."

2. "If we put in the effort, correct the mistakes, confront those vested interests and take on the failed ideas of the past, then I know we can turn this ship around."

3. "We can choose to be a country that's back on its feet and striding forward."

THE SINCEREST FORM OF FLATTERY - AND GOOD POLITICS

Vested interests: Last week Ed Miliband told the Labour conference: "I will take on the vested interests wherever they are." Today David Cameron said: "If we fool ourselves that we can do these things ....without confronting vested interests and failed ideas.. then we're not going to get anywhere."

Responsibility: Last week Mr Miliband said: "We must challenge irresponsible, predatory practices wherever we find them." Today Mr Cameron said: "We need businesses to be more socially responsible."

Benefit abuse: Last week Mr Miliband said: "There are people taking something for nothing. And at the same time people who have paid into the system all their lives find the safety net full of holes." Mr Cameron said: "Under Labour, they got something for nothing, with us they'll only get something, if they give something."

WIT AND WISDOM

1. "Much of my leadership is about unleashing your leadership."

2. "Frankly, there's too much 'can't do' sogginess around."

3. "Do you suppose anyone in China is thinking: I know how we'll grow our economy - let's get those diabetics off our roads."

4. "We don't boo our leaders."

5. "Britannia didn't rule the waves with arm-bands on."

6. "It's not the size of the dog in the fight - it's the size of the fight in the dog."

7. "We need to be more like us. The real us."

THE LANGUAGE OF MORALITY

Image caption The prime minister spoke for 50 minutes

Mr Cameron repeatedly used morality to explain his thinking. He said the country had clear instructions: "Lead us out of this economic mess... in a way that's right and fair. And as you do it, make sure you build something worthwhile for us and our children."

In a reference to Libya and Afghanistan, he invoked the story of the Good Samaritan: "This is a party - ours is a country - that never walks on by." Gordon Brown would approve of that one.

On the deficit, Mr Cameron said: "Our plan is right... It falls to us to clear up after the Labour Party. I have insisted that we do it in a fair way." He added: "Leadership in the world is about moral strength as much as military might."

POLICY ANNOUNCEMENTS IN FULL

1. He promised to reform the adoption system. He said the government would "take apart the bureaucracy" and end "the scandal" of the low adoption rates that left so many children in care.

2. He said the number of places in the National Citizens Service would be tripled to 90,000 in 2014.

3. Er, that's it.

MOST CHALLENGING MESSAGES FOR TORY FAITHFUL

Planning reforms: "To those who oppose everything we are doing, my message is this: Take your arguments down to the job centre. We've got to get Britain back to work."

International aid: "This is the right thing to do. It is a mark of our country, and our people, that we never turn our backs on the world's poorest."

Legalising gay marriage: "I don't support gay marriage despite being a Conservative. I support gay marriage because I am a Conservative."

CROWD PLEASERS FOR TORY FAITHFUL

Europe: "This country will never join the euro. And I won't let us be sucked into endless bail-outs of countries that are in the euro."

Slogan for the next election: "We must never let these Labour politicians anywhere near our economy again."

Marriage: "We will recognise marriage in the tax system." He did not, though, say when.

MOST UNSUBTLE DIGS AT COLLEAGUES

1. Mr Cameron publicly acknowledged the leadership ambitions of the Chancellor, George Osborne, by joking about the audio book he chose to record for blind people: "There was a huge scramble for The Man Who Would Be King. I think George got their first."

2. Mr Cameron pointedly acknowledged the Right's fears that Ken Clarke is not tough enough on crime, saying he had personally chosen an audio book for the justice secretary: "I said Ken: this one's Crime and Punishment. And I want you to read it. Twice."

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