As it happened: Tuesday at the Labour Party conference 2012

Key Points

  • Labour leader Ed Miliband has pledged to make Britain "one nation" and unveiled plans to help the "forgotten" 50% of youngsters
  • Dame Tessa Jowell led a session on the triumph of Team GB at the London Olympics, with a warm welcome for Tory peer and Locog chair Seb Coe
  • Shadow chief secretary to the Treasury Rachel Reeves has led a panel discussion on the campaign for a living wage
  1.  
    0930:

    Welcome to our live coverage of Tuesday's action at the Labour conference, as delegates await the centrepiece of the week: the leader's speech. Ed Miliband reportedly plans to boost his profile by talking about how his background has sculpted his values.

     
  2.  
    0936:

    Mr Miliband is also expected to unveil proposals for a new qualification for 18-year-olds - the "technical baccalaureate" - and reform apprenticeships by giving businesses more control over them. His speech is due to kick off at about 2.15pm.

     
  3.  
    0938:

    But before that, a session entitled "better together": Labour's tagline for tackling the SNP and its plan for an independent Scotland. Deputy Labour leader Harriet Harman will spearhead the debate from about 10.15am, before speeches from shadow Welsh secretary Owen Smith, shadow Scottish secretary Margaret Curran, and Labour's leader in Scotland Johann Lamont.

     
  4.  
    0940:

    Dame Tessa Jowell, credited with conceiving the idea to bid for the 2012 Olympics, has earned a primetime slot devoted to hailing the many triumphs of Team GB and NI, beginning at 10.45am.

     
  5.  
    0940:

    But first of all, a panel discussion on the campaign for a living wage, chaired by shadow chief secretary to the Treasury Rachel Reeves.

     
  6.  
    0946:

    And we're off - to a faltering start. Labour's charismatic executive committee chairman Michael Cashman invites the first speaker of the day to "prevent", rather than present, a report to conference. "Now there's a Freudian slip!" he chortled. "Obviously my brain had an idea but my tongue rejected it."

     
  7.  
    0948:

    From the BBC's Kayte Rath, in Manchester: Late last night the conference hall was resounding to the sound of Chariots of Fire and much whooping and cheering as people practiced enthusiastically for this morning's "Team Great Britain" session with Tessa Jowell.

     
  8.  
    0952:

    Ukip leader Nigel Farage tweets: Ed Miliband's speech today: I can hardly wait. Am glued to my seat already.

     
  9.  
    0958:

    Ms Reeves hails the living wage campaign as "the kind of change we want to see and the kind of difference we can make to people's lives". Labour ended the "disgrace of people being paid less than a minimum wage", as soon as it could after it came to power in 1997. This lifted two million peple, most of them women, out of poverty wages, she says.

     
  10.  
    1003:

    A string of local authorities around the country have recently decided to start paying their staff the living wage, she announces.

     
  11.  
    1010:

    From the BBC's Kayte Rath, in Manchester: Looks like there could be a few Olympians around today. Just seen former British triple jumper Jonathan Edwards in the newsroom.

     
  12.  
    1013:

    From the BBC's Brian Wheeler in Manchester: Spotted on Monday night: Lord Adonis dining alone in the Pizza Express just outside the conference security cordon. Perhaps the former transport secretary was waiting for friends...

     
  13.  
    1015:

    As delegate Fran Matthew struggled to be heard explaining the difference a living wage had made to her life, Ms Reeves moved in close and handed over her own microphone.

    Fran Matthew and Rachel Reeves
     
  14.  
    1016:

    From the BBC's Kayte Rath, in Manchester: At a New Statesman fringe meeting last night Ed Balls denied he's been making any overtures to Vince Cable on a future Lib Lab coalition. "He's never sent a text to me," he said. "I haven't even got his mobile phone number."

     
  15.  
    1017:

    From the BBC's Kayte Rath, in Manchester: The shadow chancellor also said there was "absolutely no possibility" that he and Ed Miliband would repeat the same mistakes in their relationship as Tony Blair and Gordon Brown. He said he "didn't give a toss" Mr Miliband didn't give him the post of shadow chancellor straightaway: "We're a team and it's going really well," he said. "If I can be the chancellor to Ed Miliband's leader, that would be fabulous and the peak of my political career."

     
  16.  
    1023:

    The Institute for Fiscal Studies estimated in 2010 that 7.3 million people were earning less than the living wage, which was then £7.85 per hour in London and £7.60 in the rest of the UK.

     
  17.  
    1028:

    Gordon Matheson, the leader of Glasgow City Council, proudly proclaims that his organisation pays its staff the living wage.

     
  18.  
    1028:

    From the BBC's Kayte Rath in Manchester: It's a very soggy morning here in Manchester, but people are still braving the elements to get their flyers handed out.

    People handing out leaflets outside Labour conference
     
  19.  
    1034:

    Labour deputy leader Harriet Harman takes to the stage to make the case for the continuing inclusion of Scotland in the UK. "We all believe that the good things that are done in each part of Britain are better for everyone in all the different parts of Britian," she says.

     
  20.  
    1035:

    Labour's new leader in Scotland, Johann Lamont, has wiped the "smug, arrogant" smile off SNP leader Alex Salmond's face, Labour's Harriet Harman says.

     
  21.  
    1040:

    "We cannot afford to listen to those who say the answer to Scotland's problems is to build a wall around ourselves," shadow Scotland secretary Margaret Curran tells conference.

     
  22.  
    1040:

    From the BBC's Kayte Rath in Manchester: For those who fancy a little pampering in-between the speeches and fringe meetings, there is a chance to get your nails done by The Pressure. For Ed Miliband's nails, they recommend a "cheeky little red" to match his red ties.

    A woman gets her nails painted at conference
     
  23.  
    1046:

    "In 2014, Scotland faces a decision on whether or not to break up Britain," shadow Scotland secretary Margaret Curran continues. "A decision with consequences not only for every Scot, but also for every person across these islands."

     
  24.  
    1046:
    Ed Miliband Seated on the main stage, Labour leader Ed Miliband watches a video presentation on Scotland
     
  25.  
    1049:

    "Politics is about what you choose to be, and what you choose to aspire to. It is not defined by where you are born, but it is defined by what you want to do for the people of this country," Labour's leader in Scotland Johann Lamont says.

     
  26.  
    1053:

    The SNP is coming under fire from a sustained rhetorical barrage here. Scottish Labour leader Johann Lamont tries to dismantle the party's left-wing credentials.

     
  27.  
    1053:

    First Minister Alex Salmond "knows that his budget will go bust, but he hopes somehow that he can keep the truth from the British people until after the referendum", Labour MSP Johann Lamont says.

     
  28.  
    1055:

    The BBC's Tim Reid tweets: Johann Lamont tells #lab12 "When George Osborne cut the budget, Alex Salmond cut it deeper for Scotland's local authorities"

     
  29.  
    1056:

    Shadow Welsh secretary Owen Smith opens his speech with tributes to the family of the missing five-year-old girl from Powys. "We all hope and pray that she is back with her family as soon as is humanly possible," he says.

     
  30.  
    1058:

    From the BBC's Kayte Rath in Manchester: Everyone who goes into the main conference hall today is getting union jack flags to wave, to make the visiting Olympians feel at home.

     
  31.  
    1100:

    From the BBC's Kayte Rath, in Manchester: Blackwell's book stall says there's a close fight for their best-selling book here. The race is between Denis Kavanagh's book on Philip Gould and Jack Straw's autobiography - although Mr Straw has apparently been boosting his sales by "hovering" around the stall and getting people to buy his memoirs. "He's a very good salesman," they say.

     
  32.  
    1100:

    From the BBC's Kayte Rath, in Manchester: It's bad news for Tony Blair, though. Blackwell's conference book stall reports that erotic novel 50 Shades of Grey is currently out-selling his book, A Journey.

     
  33.  
    1101:

    There was a "real breakthrough" for Wales last week, Labour's Owen Smith says, when US TV presenter David Letterman caught PM David Cameron out. "'What about Wales?', said Letterman: 'They didn't vote for you in Wales, did they?'" Mr Smith recalled. "At last, I thought, 106 years of not voting Tory and we're finally getting some credit for it."

     
  34.  
    1105:

    Former Olympics minister Dame Tessa Jowell takes to the stage with the theme from Chariots of Fire reverberating around the hall.

     
  35.  
    1107:

    "We won the bid against all the odds," former culture secretary Dame Tessa Jowell says. "The doubters said it would cost too much... but we always knew it would work."

     
  36.  
    1109:

    Dame Tessa Jowell offers thanks and praise to the workers who helped deliver the Olympics and its venues on time and with a commendable safety record.

     
  37.  
    1112:

    In the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta, UK athletes won just one gold medal, former Olympics minister Tessa Jowell recalls. But this year they won 29. The Paralympians showed us that disability is not a bar to greatness, she adds.

     
  38.  
    1115:

    Moving beyond points of political consensus, former Olympics minister Tessa Jowell says that cuts to school sports provision are "beyond belief". We need to show that the slogan "inspire a generation" was a meaningful promise, she tells delegates.

     
  39.  
    1117:
    Peter Reid Former England midfielder and Sunderland manager Peter Reid spotted in the crowd during Owen Smith's speech
     
  40.  
    1119:

    The BBC's Ross Hawkins tweets: Labour conference cheers Tory peer Seb Coe

     
  41.  
    1124:

    Conservative peer Lord Coe, the chair of the London Olympics organising committee, tells the conference: "It's been one amazing national journey that we've all been involved in... We've done it with a unity of purpose that is almost unique in any big project."

     
  42.  
    1126:

    Party political differences were abandoned as the UK prepared for the Games, Locog chair and Tory peer Lord Coe says. Warning Labour's Tessa Jowell he wouldn't spare her blushes, he says: "We couldn't have done it without you."

     
  43.  
    1127:
    Jonathan Edwards, Paul Deighton and Lord Coe Jonathan Edwards, Lord Coe and Paul Deighton take to the stage to a standing ovation
     
  44.  
    1128:

    Labour's former No 10 communications chief Alastair Campbell tweets: Standing ovation for a Tory at Labour conference. Seb Coe legend. Great mood at celebration of Olympics and Paralympics #Lab12

     
  45.  
    1133:

    London 2012 games maker and the BBC's Welsh parliamentary correspondent David Cornock tweets from the conference hall: Fantastic response at #lab12 for #gamesmakers

     
  46.  
    1134:

    Comedian Eddie Izzard warmly thanks the many volunteers who made the Olympics such a success. "They were so switched on, they were so helpful," he says. "They gave up their time, they did it for free, they stayed on people's floors... Britain appreciated it, and I think the world appreciated it."

     
  47.  
    1140:

    From the BBC's Kayte Rath, in Manchester: The hall is going crazy for the Olympians, with nearly everyone on their feet waving their flags welcoming the guests on stage.

     
  48.  
    1141:

    Labour continues to bask in the reflected glory of Team GB's Olympics successes, as Dame Tessa welcomes onto the stage a selection of individuals who played integral roles in the lives of some of the team's stars, including Mo Farah's PE teacher.

     
  49.  
    1148:

    From the BBC's Kayte Rath, in Manchester: Here's Lisa Nandy MP having a go on the Guide Dogs charity's Scalextric track. She says she's got her own track at home, but will she make it to the top of the leader board...?

    Lisa Nandy MP
     
  50.  
    1150:

    From the BBC's Kayte Rath, in Manchester: The Guide Dogs charity is highlighting the problem quieter electric cars will pose for blind people by getting MPs at all the conferences to race each other on a Scalextric track.

     
  51.  
    1150:

    Alan Watkinson, who taught Mo Farrer PE at school, demonstrates his former protégé's signature move. Most delegates respond with "mo-bots" of their own, the BBC's Kayte Rath says.

    Alan Watkinson
     
  52.  
    1151:

    Sky's political editor Adam Boulton tweets: #Lab12 pumping the hall full of feel good gas pre-Ed's speech - rapturous reception for Dame Tessa Jowell and the Olympians/Paralympians

     
  53.  
    1158:

    From the BBC's Kayte Rath, in Manchester: The Guide Dogs charity's red Scalextric car has already proven so popular with delegates that it's completely worn out. But the blue and yellow car remain on track. Labour better hope that's not a metaphor for the conference.

     
  54.  
    1202:

    "I didn't realise the impact I was going to have on the nation," Gold medal-winning boxer Nicola Adams tells the conference. "It feels like an honour to have people looking up to me, and to have inspired them to take up sport, and get healthy."

     
  55.  
    1206:

    The conference has now taken a break for lunch. Delegates will flood back into the hall in the build-up to party leader Ed Miliband's speech, which is due at about 2.15pm.

     
  56.  
    1210:

    Rafael Behr, the New Statesman's political editor, tweets: If Ed M wants to play a 'geeky and proud of it' card he should walk on stage with Rubik's cube and solve it before he starts his speech.

     
  57.  
    1212:

    The Daily Mail's deputy political editor Tim Shipman tweets: David Miliband has left Labour conference, we are told, so he does not 'overshadow' his brother. Last year that made sense. This year it sounds tragic.

     
  58.  
    1215:

    On BBC Two now, the Daily Politics are discussing Ed Miliband's "personal" party political broadcast. And coming up they've got shadow work and pensions secretary Liam Byrne who this morning said Labour would make cuts to welfare. You can watch on BBC iplayer here.

     
  59.  
    1217:

    Recent opinion polls show "how soft" Labour's lead is at the moment, Andrew Hawkins from Comres tells the BBC's Daily Politics. Although the Lib Dems got a "bounce" from their recent conference, he says the state of the polls shows Labour and Ed Miliband have fundamental challenges.

     
  60.  
    1218:

    Also reflecting on recent polls - one of which put Labour only three points ahead - Stephan Shakespeare from YouGov says Labour have "yet to find their voice", particularly on the economy. He compares efforts to give Ed Miliband a clearer public identity to Iain Duncan Smith's much-derided "quiet man" phase in 2003.

     
  61.  
    1223:

    Shadow health secretary Andy Burnham is on Radio 4's World at One programme today. Earlier this week he seemed to contradict Ed Miliband when he said he would repeal the government's health bill. Listen from 1300 BST on the BBC's radio player here.

     
  62.  
    1224:

    More views on Ed Miliband's task ahead of his big speech this afternoon. Rowenna Davies, from the New Statesman, says the Labour leader is playing a "long game" and ultimately hopes that trust in him will win out over charisma.

     
  63.  
    1230:

    Talking about Labour's plan for a new vocational qualification at 18, shadow work and pension secretary Liam Byrne tells the BBC there is a "real hunger" for it among both pupils and employers.

     
  64.  
    1232:

    The shadow work and pensions secretary is being pressed about Ed Miliband's standing in the polls. Mr Byrne says the "consistent trend" has been upwards and the Labour leader has united the party and "set the tempo" for political debate.

     
  65.  
    1235:

    As for the economy, Liam Byrne tells the Daily Politics there's "a growing sense" the government's economic plan hasn't worked out well - and that the public are "deeply dissatisfied" with the current state of affairs.

     
  66.  
    1235:

    But Mr Byrne also acknowledges Labour has "a lot more to do" to convince people to vote for a Labour government in 2015.

     
  67.  
    1248:

    More reaction to Labour's plan for a new "Tecc Baccalaureate" for 18-year olds. Martin Doel, from the Association of Colleges, says he "welcomes the concept" but the details need to be clarified.

     
  68.  
    1252:

    Labour frontbencher Sadiq Khan defends the focus in Ed Miliband's big speech on his comprehensive school education. Mr Khan says "the country wants to hear" about the Labour leader's life and how it has shaped his values.

     
  69.  
    1253:

    "You're right to criticise us for not doing enough" to improve state education, shadow justice secretary Sadiq Khan concedes on the BBC's Daily Politics.

     
  70.  
    1255:

    BBC political editor Nick Robinson tweets: Ed Miliband will ally himself with a former Tory leader. Blog on its way.

     
  71.  
    1302:

    "In 1872 a Tory leader, Benjamin Disraeli, spoke out in favour of helping 'the condition of working men'... to heal the divide between rich and poor," blogs BBC political editor Nick Robinson. "I expect Mr Miliband to try to claim that mantle 140 years later."

     
  72.  
    1307:

    Tom Newton Dunn, the Sun's political editor, tweets: I've had a whiff of the main line in Ed's speech; and it's clever. Prepare for quite a cheeky lurch to the centre. #lab12

     
  73.  
    1313:

    Admirers are now queuing up outside the conference hall to hear Labour leader Ed Miliband's speech. "He's a decent man, a good man, and a clever man," a delegate called Maureen tells BBC Radio 4's The World at One.

     
  74.  
    1317:

    The leader of the opposition never scores highly in opinion polls, Unison's Dave Prentis tells BBC Radio 4's The World at One. "He's young, he's got time," Mr Prentis says of Mr Miliband, "but you cannot deny that the polls quite clearly say that they do not yet know him".

     
  75.  
    1325:

    Academy schools are becoming the new grammar schools, Labour frontbencher Andy Burnham tells BBC Radio 4's The World at One. The government is elitist at heart, he complains.

     
  76.  
    1326:

    Labourlist editor Mark Ferguson tweets: Really interesting to hear the term "One Nation Labour" gaining resonance - potential for Labour to be the only truly national party #lab12

     
  77.  
    1331:

    On BBC Radio 4's The World at One, shadow health secretary Andy Burnham vows to "expose new information tomorrow about the pace and scale of privatisation in the NHS", demonstrating how coalition plans will "change the basis of healthcare" in England. A "full-blown market in healthcare" was the "real intention" of the government's NHS reforms, he says.

     
  78.  
    1338:
    Tessa Jowell and Seb Coe Labour's Tessa Jowell and Conservative peer Seb Coe enjoy shared memories of Olympic glory
     
  79.  
    1348:

    The academic behind the term "pre-distribution" has told BBC Radio 4's The World at One that he found it "a little surprising" that Labour had espoused his concept "as a central aspect of the party philosophy".

     
  80.  
    1346:

    The BBC's Norman Smith tweets: It is tipping down in Manchester so no live "conference walk" for Ed M and wife into conference centre #drownedratland #lab12

     
  81.  
    1352:

    From the BBC's Kayte Rath, in Manchester: There are hundreds of people queuing to get into the hall to hear the leader's speech. Some of them started queueing two hours ago.

     
  82.  
    1353:

    "I have been told that there is only one person in British politics who would like the term pre-distribution, and that's Ed Miliband," Jacob Hacker told BBC Radio 4's the World at One. It might not feature on many placards, the professor behind the concept conceded, but the ideas underlying it - increasing equality of opportunity, supporting education and strengthening unions - certainly would, he said.

     
  83.  
    1357:

    From the BBC's Justin Parkinson: Back at Westminster, the politicos (and pelicans) are getting a bit of rest before the big speech.

    Man and pelican on park bench in Westminster
     
  84.  
    1357:

    From the BBC's Kayte Rath, in Manchester: There are hundreds of people queuing to get into the hall to hear the leader's speech. Some of them started queuing two hours ago.

    Conference hall The scene in the hall awaiting them.
     
  85.  
    1359:

    The BBC News Channel's chief political correspondent Norman Smith reveals a few titbits expected in Ed Miliband's imminent speech. Norman says there'll be no new policy announcements. There won't be any manifesto pledges. And there certainly won't be any new spending commitments.

     
  86.  
    1402:

    The BBC's Norman Smith says the Labour leader's team are making clear that the speech will be about "Ed Miliband, the man". But he is also expected to reference Benjamin Disraeli. The 19th century Conservative prime minister came up with the One Nation label to describe how he intended to represent people from all social classes.

     
  87.  
    1415:
    Ed Miliband and his wife Justine Ed Miliband and his wife Justine arrive at the conference venue ahead of the big speech
     
  88.  
    1416:

    The Daily Mail's Tim Shipman tweets: Nation on tenterhooks as man prepares to emerge and say 'Who am I?'

     
  89.  
    1418:

    The BBC's political editor Nick Robinson says the phrase One Nation will not mean much to many people but it has tremendous "historical and political resonance".

     
  90.  
    1421:

    From the BBC's Kayte Rath, in Manchester: Lots of people have decided not to queue up, instead plumping for the prime seating area in front of the Sky News operation, where one of a number TVs will be beaming the speech out live. No more seats left there either but people don't seem to mind sitting on the floor.

     
  91.  
    1421:

    While attacking David Cameron, Mr Miliband will sketch out only in "the broadest terms" what he would do in government, BBC political editor Nick Robinson says.

     
  92.  
    1422:

    Ed Miliband has entered the conference hall in Manchester to a standing ovation from party members.

     
  93.  
    1423:

    "It is great to be in Labour Manchester," Ed Miliband begins. "I am prouder than ever to be the leader of the Labour party."

     
  94.  
    1426:

    "I always look forward to conference, but the leader's speech can be a bit of a trial," Mr Miliband confides. But he says he drew on his son for inspiration. "Daddy, I can help you with your speech," he said, "I want dinosaurs!"

     
  95.  
    1427:

    Ed Miliband says he wants "to do something different" in his speech - by telling his family story.

     
  96.  
    1428:

    Mr Miliband says his family "have not lived under the same oak tree for 500 years".

     
  97.  
    1428:

    One of Ed Miliband's teachers, Chris Dunne, is in the audience. Mr Milband pays tribute to him and also references his old headmistress, a Mrs Jenkins.

     
  98.  
    1428:

    A fashion update from the BBC's Rebecca Keating, who tweets: Justine Thornton - Ed Miliband's wife - is wearing a navy Joseph dress with red shoes from Hobbs & a Welsh dragon broach

     
  99.  
    1429:
    John Prescott Former deputy prime minister John Prescott in the crowd for the leader's speech
     
  100.  
    1429:

    Mr Miliband says his parents did not talk much about their wartime experiences and journey across Europe. He says they felt pain and "guilt" about their survival - when so many lost their lives.

     
  101.  
    1430:

    Political director of the Huffington Post, Mehdi Hasan, tweets: Internal Labour focus group research shows when Ed talks about his dad/background his ratings zoom up.

     
  102.  
    1430:

    Ed Miliband talks about his friendship with Ruth First, a South African politician and anti-apartheid activist who was killed by a parcel bomb.

     
  103.  
    1430:
    Labour leader Ed Miliband Ed Miliband waves to the party faithful as he takes to the stage to a standing ovation
     
  104.  
    1431:

    The Labour leader is elaborating about his political "faith" - his belief in leaving the country in a better place.

     
  105.  
    1431:

    Wigan's Labour MP Lisa Nandy tweets from the conference: The public are getting to see what Ed Miliband is like in private - funny, confident and committed to social justice

     
  106.  
    1433:

    Ed Miliband seeks to make a joke about his "Red Ed" tag - given to him by certain newspapers. He says his father, a Marxist academic, would have been "disappointed" that this wasn't true.

     
  107.  
    1433:

    After the early preamble about his education and family, we are beginning to get to the meat of the speech.

     
  108.  
    1433:

    The Sun's political correspondent Craig Woodhouse tweets: Not sure talking about feeling a duty to fix the world will help in the 'normal' stakes. Ed's delivering this well though

     
  109.  
    1434:
    Douglas Alexander, Ed Balls and Harriet Harman A warm welcome for Ed Miliband from his frontbench team
     
  110.  
    1434:

    Mr Miliband talks about an unemployed woman who sent her CV to 137 employers but did not get any replies. The hopes of a generation risk "being crushed", he adds.

     
  111.  
    1435:

    Political journalist and commentator Iain Martin tweets a warning for Mr Miliband: I say it again. Ed is too close to the edge of the stage. If he falls off it's Kinnock on the beach x 100.

     
  112.  
    1436:

    Mr Miliband says he also wants to talk to people who were once comfortably off but now find themselves struggling - an allusion to the "squeezed middle" the Labour leader has often mentioned.

     
  113.  
    1436:

    The Labour leader rebukes train companies for putting up fares well above the level of inflation, even as profits soar.

     
  114.  
    1437:

    Labour campaigner and commentator Owen Jones tweets: Glad Ed Miliband talking about unemployed people desperate for work that doesn't exist - rather than being scroungers

     
  115.  
    1439:

    Ed Miliband is now reflecting on the success of the Olympics and Paralympics. He praises British troops who helped with security, the volunteer Games Makers and athletes ranging from Zara Philipps to Mo Farah.

     
  116.  
    1438:
    Justine Thornton Ed Miliband's wife, Justine Thornton (on the left of the picture), smiles as she listens to the Labour leader
     
  117.  
    1441:

    The Labour leader says London 2012 "held up a mirror" to who we are as a country - "we succeeded because of us, the British people", he says.

     
  118.  
    1441:

    The Olympics united the country, Mr Miliband goes on to say, adding that it stirred emotions and feelings that he had not witnessed before.

     
  119.  
    1442:

    The Daily Telegraph's deputy political editor James Kirkup tweets: Now that we're back off the personal biography stuff, Ed M's delivery is better again. At this rate, speech will go down well.

     
  120.  
    1443:

    After London 2012, Mr Miliband now moves onto more ancient history. He talks about a speech given 140 years ago by former Tory prime minister Benjamin Disraeli in Manchester's Free Trade Hall.

     
  121.  
    1442:
    Ed Miliband on stage "We achieved more [at the Olympics] than we imagined possible," Ed Miliband tells conference
     
  122.  
    1444:

    Disraeli's One Nation vision was of a country where "no-one was left out", Mr Miliband stresses.

     
  123.  
    1444:

    Mr Miliband says he believes in a One Nation vision of society, where "everyone has a stake" and prosperity is universally shared.

     
  124.  
    1445:

    LBC Radio's James Max isn't impressed yet. He tweets: If Ed Miliband's biggest round of applause comes from the Olympics then there's very little substance here. Please, I want policy Ed!

     
  125.  
    1445:

    Mr Miliband evokes the post-war 1945 Labour government of Clement Attlee as an example of One Nation attitudes as well as the war-time spirit that helped the UK "through the storm".

     
  126.  
    1447:

    The Labour leader brings the history lesson up to date by saying people need to demonstrate the values Disraeli espoused to help "rebuild the country".

     
  127.  
    1447:

    Ed Miliband now makes his first attack on David Cameron, saying he has been given the benefit of the doubt but has been found wanting.

     
  128.  
    1448:

    The Labour leader is now onto the substance of his economic arguments, pointing out that borrowing is going up despite the government's spending cuts.

     
  129.  
    1447:

    The BBC's Norman Smith tweets: Ed Miliband says he understands why voters turned away from Labour and wanted to give David Cameron a chance

     
  130.  
    1449:

    Recession, high unemployment, rising borrowing - Mr Miliband says this is not "what people were expecting" from the coalition government.

     
  131.  
    1449:
    Ed Miliband A pack of photographers train their lenses on the Labour leader
     
  132.  
    1450:

    Ed Milband says the government must change course on the economy - "if the medicine is not working, you change the medicine".

     
  133.  
    1450:

    Spectator editor Fraser Nelson still needs some convincing. He tweets: Miliband now quoting Disraeli about "one nation". Something tells me this is his theme: One Nation Labourism. Doesn't quite scan.

     
  134.  
    1451:

    Continuing the medical analogy, the Labour leader gets a loud cheer when he calls for "the doctor to be changed" too.

     
  135.  
    1452:

    The Sun's David Wooding tweets some advice for the Labour leader: Ed's been talking for 15 mins. Audience has had enough touchy feely stuff now. Time for some red meat

     
  136.  
    1453:

    Reducing the top rate of tax shows reward millionaires, Mr Miliband says, and shows the government has the wrong priorities. Mr Miliband suggests David Cameron "is not just writing the cheques" but will benefit from the move as well.

     
  137.  
    1453:

    Mr Miliband says the cut to the 50p tax rate cannot be justified when the majority are struggling - and he attacks the Lib Dems for allowing it to happen.

     
  138.  
    1453:

    Jack Straw's son Will, an associate director of think tank IPPR, tweets: Ed M clearly been taking lessons from Bill Clinton in framing the economic argument by taking counter-arguments head on.

     
  139.  
    1454:

    The Labour leader says Mr Cameron "cannot be a One Nation prime minister" if you cut taxes for millionaires and raise taxes for working families.

     
  140.  
    1455:
    A conference delegate Miliband on demand: a delegate records the speech on her mobile phone
     
  141.  
    1456:

    Ed Miliband says the row between Conservative Chief Whip Andrew Mitchell and police officers outside No 10 shows the government cannot unite the country.

     
  142.  
    1456:

    Labour MP and shadow health minister Jamie Reed is impressed with his leader. He tweets: Really very good, forensic, clear arguments. And honestly 'wonkish'. Authentic.

     
  143.  
    1457:

    The loudest cheer of the speech so far as Ed Miliband accuses the government of being incompetent, out of touch and a "miserable shower".

     
  144.  
    1459:

    A wide-ranging attack from the Labour leader now, as he pokes fun at David Cameron's links with Rupert Murdoch and newspaper executives and Tory chairman Grant Shapps' business interests.

     
  145.  
    1459:

    Ed Miliband moves onto welfare, with a double-sided message. The government has a responsibility to help those who cannot work, particularly the disabled, while those who can work have a "responsibility to take what is on offer".

     
  146.  
    1500:

    Fact checkers full-fact.org say they've checked out Ed Miliband's claim that the prime minister is writing a £40,000 cheque to millionaires. Here's the link.

     
  147.  
    1501:

    The Labour leader says he cannot promise to reverse all coalition cuts if he is prime minister. There will be "tough" settlements on pay and other areas, he makes clear.

     
  148.  
    1501:

    Mr Miliband repeats the phrase One Nation for the umpteenth time. To be One Nation, he says his party cannot return to being "Old Labour" and must appeal to voters in both the south and north of England.

     
  149.  
    1502:
    Neil Kinnock Former Labour leader Neil Kinnock enjoying the speech
     
  150.  
    1501:

    Ed Miliband has a new fan. Independent London mayoral candidate Siobhan Benita tweets: Watching @Ed_Miliband with respect and admiration. Good speech really well delivered. Nice to see his personality coming through.

     
  151.  
    1503:

    There is also a critique of the New Labour government. He says it was "too silent" about the responsibilities of those at the top of society and "too timid" about holding the powerful - including Rupert Murdoch - to account.

     
  152.  
    1504:

    The Labour leader now moves onto the banking industry, saying the UK's banks "must serve the country" - not the other way round.

     
  153.  
    1505:

    Unusually, watching reporters haven't been been given an advanced copy of the speech. Channel 4's Jon Snow thinks the tactic worked. He tweets: Much more concentration in the hall here in Manchester on WHAT Milliband is saying rather than How he is saying it

     
  154.  
    1506:

    Mr Miliband says British banks must agree to separate their High Street and "casino" operations voluntarily or Labour will pass a law to force them to do so.

     
  155.  
    1507:

    Mr Miliband is now moving on to education. True opportunity for every pupil is not just "socially right" but essential to the future of the economy, he insists.

     
  156.  
    1507:
    Rachel Reeves, Sadiq Khan, Andy Burnham Smiles all round from the shadow cabinet
     
  157.  
    1508:

    Tony Blair's target of enabling 50% of children to go to university was right at the time, Mr Miliband says, but Labour must now focus on the other "forgotten 50%" who want to go a different route.

     
  158.  
    1508:

    Deputy Telegraph editor Benedict Brogan hopes the prime minister is watching. He tweets: Dave needs to pay close attention to this One Nation Labour thing. EdMil is picking his pocket.

     
  159.  
    1509:

    The Labour leader unveils his party's widely trailed plan for a new "gold standard" vocational qualification for 18-year olds.

     
  160.  
    1509:
    The scene in the hall A full house for the leader's speech
     
  161.  
    1510:

    The BBC's Mark Easton tweets: Ed M parking his Ford Popular right in the centre of British politics with 'One Nation' stuck across the windscreen

     
  162.  
    1511:

    Companies will not be awarded government contracts in future under Labour unless they have an apprenticeship scheme in place, the Labour leader adds.

     
  163.  
    1513:

    Mr Miliband's compares his vision with that of education secretary Michael Gove, who he says has "contempt" for vocational qualifications.

     
  164.  
    1513:

    While Conservative education policy is predicated on a "narrower and narrower elite" prospering, Mr Miliband says Labour would offer opportunity to all.

     
  165.  
    1514:

    A predictive tweet from the Observer's political editor Toby Helm: One Nation Labour is the slogan from now until the next election.

     
  166.  
    1515:

    Editor of Tory activists' website Conservative Home, Tim Montgomerie, tweets: When Ed Miliband plans for equivalence on pay and pensions and hours between private and public sectors I'll believe him about one nation

     
  167.  
    1515:

    The Labour leader makes a brief reference to last year's conference address, where he controversially sought to differentiate between firms that were either "producers and predators". He insists he still wants to crack down on short-termism in the City.

     
  168.  
    1517:

    The Labour leader is now onto immigration, which is beneficial for the economy, he says, but the system has to "work for all" and his party has "too often overlooked" public concerns.

     
  169.  
    1518:
    Ed Miliband Ed Miliband has opted for a purple tie - the same colour worn by his political adversary, Nick Clegg, during his Lib Dem conference speech
     
  170.  
    1518:

    The use of foreign workers cannot be allowed to undercut the pay of British workers, the Labour leader says. He also pledges to crack down on gangmasters.

     
  171.  
    1518:

    Conservative thinker and think-tank director Phillip Blond tweets: Labour is now playing class politics with the tories - they are accusing the tories of restoring a class based society - Cameron vulnerable

     
  172.  
    1519:

    The Labour leader is now addressing the future of the UK and Scotland. Mr Miliband says Scotland could go it alone but the UK would be poorer as a result, "not just in pounds and pence" but in "the soul" of the nation.

     
  173.  
    1520:

    The different nations of the UK have "common and deep bonds", Mr Miliband adds, exhorting Labour to lead the fight to preserve the union.

     
  174.  
    1521:

    Mr Miliband has now been talking for almost 40 minutes.

     
  175.  
    1522:

    The Labour leader is now onto the future of the NHS, attacking David Cameron for breaking a "solemn promise" not to launch a fundamental re-organisation.

     
  176.  
    1522:
    Shadow Scotland secretary Margaret Curran Shadow Scotland secretary Margaret Curran shows her support
     
  177.  
    1523:

    Ed Miliband gets a cheer from his audience as he reads out the list of medical professionals who he says have opposed the government's reforms.

     
  178.  
    1523:

    Guardian columnist Jonathan Freedland tweets a prediction: Tories and Blairites will attack this speech for lack of "fiscal realism"

     
  179.  
    1524:

    The NHS should not be based on ability to pay and leaving "your credit card at the door", Mr Miliband says.

     
  180.  
    1524:

    The government regards the NHS as just another industry like gas or electricity when it should be seen as "the pride of the nation", he adds.

     
  181.  
    1525:

    The audience cheers loudly as Mr Miliband says the Conservatives cannot be trusted on the NHS and he will repeal the government's reforms to the NHS in England.

     
  182.  
    1526:

    We are coming to the end of the speech. Mr Miliband is now talking about the small village in Poland where his mother was born.

     
  183.  
    1526:

    Britain has "given his family everything", Mr Miliband adds.

     
  184.  
    1526:
    Andy Burnham Shadow health secretary Andy Burnham listens intently to Mr Miliband's words on the NHS
     
  185.  
    1528:

    The Labour leader concludes by saying "it falls to Labour again" to rebuild Britain, insisting that their task is not an "impossible dream".

     
  186.  
    1529:

    The BBC's Andrew Neil says that Mr Miliband spoke for more than an hour - longer than had been expected - and at times without notes.

     
  187.  
    1528:

    Mori pollster Ben Page tweets: Ed Miliband speech going down better with commentariat than advance predictions. Lets see if country notices.

     
  188.  
    1530:

    Ed Balls and Harriet Harman are among those clapping as the Labour leader makes his way through the audience with his wife Justine.

     
  189.  
    1532:

    The Labour leader has left the conference hall and the audience is beginning to disperse. The BBC's Andrew Neil says the speech was confidently delivered but was short on policy.

     
  190.  
    1532:
    Ed Miliband and Justine Thornton A post-speech Ed Miliband is joined on the stage by his wife, Justine
     
  191.  
    1533:

    The verdicts are coming thick and fast. The BBC's Nick Robinson said it was a "pretty spectacular" performance and also a real "feat of memory".

     
  192.  
    1534:

    The recurring use of the One Nation theme, historically associated with the Conservatives, was "audacious" - Nick Robinson adds.

     
  193.  
    1532:

    Fraser Nelson, who edits the traditionally Conservative-supporting Spectator magazine, reckons Ed Miliband came across as "likeable and good-humoured" as he is in person. And he "spoke very well".

     
  194.  
    1533:

    But the Spectator's Fraser Nelson adds he's not impressed by the content. "He found his voice in this speech", he writes. "And that's what he had to say made me more apprehensive, not less, about the prospect of a Miliband government."

     
  195.  
    1538:

    Critics will say "where's the beef" when it comes to policy commitments, Nick Robinson adds, but supporters of Mr Miliband will feel relieved and that the speech was "job done".

     
  196.  
    1538:

    Former Labour home secretary Lord Reid says he has heard most leader's speeches over the last 30 years and Mr Miliband's "was up with the best of them".

     
  197.  
    1540:

    In speaking without an autocue, the Labour leader took a "huge risk" but he pulled it off, Lord Reid tells the BBC's Daily Politics.

     
  198.  
    1542:

    An instant response from Alastair Campbell. "What Ed Miliband did today was bold personal and political positioning, with enough policy pointers to show how Labour would be different," writes the former Labour spin doctor.

     
  199.  
    1545:

    The Labour leader spoke passionately and authentically, his colleague Douglas Alexander says. Building a One Nation society will be the "defining mission" of the next Labour government, the shadow foreign secretary adds.

     
  200.  
    1545:

    According to a tweet from the Conservative Home editor Tim Montgomerie, the official Tory line on Ed Milliband's speech: "Totally substance free. Claimed one nation while fighting a class war".

     
  201.  
    1546:

    Mr Alexander is pressed about Mr Miliband's claim that millionaires will get the equivalent of a £40,000 cheque from the cut to the top rate of tax. He says he does not know how many people will benefit.

     
  202.  
    1547:

    Labour MP Tom Watson tweets: That was the best leader's speech I have ever heard. One nation.

     
  203.  
    1549:

    From the BBC's Kayte Rath, in Manchester: Some reaction from the delegates leaving the hall: "Inspirational", "brave", "passionate" and "prime ministerial" are just some of the words on the lips of those who watched the speech.

     
  204.  
    1549:

    Right-wing political blogger Guido Fawkes tweets: Good speech, audacious grab for "One Nation", Tories will be thinking how to deal with this rhetoric. Little policy, probably wise.

     
  205.  
    1551:

    Mr Miliband "is closer to Downing Street" at the end of the speech than he was before, Douglas Alexander concludes. However, he and interviewer Andrew Neil are divided over whether Disraeli actually used the One Nation phrase in his Manchester speech all those years ago.

     
  206.  

    From the BBC's Kayte Rath, in Manchester: One Scottish delegate said he liked the use of the "One Nation" slogan as a message to keep Britain together and see off the threat of independence from the SNP.

     
  207.  
    1555:

    The debate continues... The Conservative History Group believes Disraeli did not use those two powerful words in his 1872 speech. However, Andrew Neil says Tony Blair, Boris Johnson and Chuka Umunna are among other people to have appropriated the language of One Nation politics in recent years.

     
  208.  
    1556:

    The Metro newspaper's political editor John Higginson tweets: Red Ed's dead long live Blue Ed

     
  209.  
    1556:

    From the BBC's Kayte Rath, in Manchester: There doesn't seem to be too much concern over Mr Miliband's reference to Tory PM Disraeli. "He was a different Tory, not a Thatcher Tory like the ones we have now," one delegate says.

     
  210.  
    1558:

    How's Ed Miliband's speech been received by the commentariat? James Kirkup, the deputy editor of the Daily Telegraph reckons it was relaxed, fluent and warm. "He was even funny," he writes.

     
  211.  
    1559:

    And what about the substance? The Daily Telegraph's James Kirkup thinks it was good enough to make the next election a "proper competition". Ed Miliband has laid down a challenge to the prime minister: "The charge into Tory history and language poses a question that Mr Cameron may ridicule but cannot ignore."

     
  212.  
    1601:

    From the BBC's Kayte Rath, in Manchester: Not many negative comments from delegates, as you might expect, but some said the speech - at over an hour - was too long and one said that Mr Miliband tried a bit too hard to get the Tory press onside.

     
  213.  
    1603:

    Krishnan Guru-Murthy of Channel 4 News tweets some more reaction: One Nation far from new for Labour - but only chimes when you stress the rich/poor divide, which is arguably not very "one nation"

     
  214.  
    1604:

    Friends of the Earth give their verdict on the Labour leader's big speech. Director Craig Bennett says: "A tub-thumping speech, but where was the green bit? We need a one planet approach to compliment Ed Miliband's one nation vision."

     
  215.  
    1605:
    Andrew Neil Horrors! The BBC's Andrew Neil impersonates Edvard Munch's The Scream in response to the suggestion that the 2015 general election campaign starts here
     
  216.  
    1605:

    No surprise perhaps but Labour MPs are queuing up to praise their leader's speech. Jonathan Ashworth says it was "classy and substantial" while Simon Danczuk believes it was "exceptionally good". Barry Gardiner, meanwhile, argues it has "thrown down the gauntlet" to David Cameron.

     
  217.  
    1607:

    From the BBC's Kayte Rath, in Manchester: Lots of delegates are saying that Mr Miliband has succeeded in making himself look like a prime minister in waiting. "He is looking and sounding the part," one said. "He's really improved even since the beginning of the year."

     
  218.  
    1605:

    Labour figures are lining up to praise their current leader. Neil Kinnock - a man man who knows what it's like to lead a Labour opposition - says: "All the time his courage, his determination, his patriotism and his empathy, his ability to relate to people is coming through and it's all genuine."

     
  219.  
    1607:

    The BBC's chief political correspondent Norman Smith says Labour activists believe it was Mr Miliband's best speech since he became leader in 2010.

     
  220.  

    From the BBC's Kayte Rath, in Manchester: Mr Miliband's decision to speak without notes was "great" and "really showed him as a human being", one delegate says.

     
  221.  
    1609:

    Deputy leader Harriet Harman: "It was a blockbuster of a speech" which will leave people in no doubt Ed Miliband could be prime minister.

     
  222.  
    1613:

    The Sun's political editor Tom Newton Dunn tweets: YouGov's Peter Kellner: "The best Labour party leader's speech since Kinnock in 1985 and the most important since Blair in 1994".

     
  223.  
    1616:

    More instant reaction is coming in from the politicos. A piece on the Conservative Home activists' website says the speech felt "strong and purposeful". But it lacked substance, writes deputy editor Matthew Barrett. "It did not reach out to swing voters and suggest Labour is a serious party willing to take tough economic decisions."

     
  224.  
    1617:

    ITV's political editor Tom Bradby says the speech reminded him of Tony Blair. He tweets his praise: Superb, transformative speech by Ed M. On the measures that really counted today, he hit the ball out of the park.

     
  225.  
    1621:
    Harriet Harman Labour's deputy leader Harriet Harman came straight out of the conference hall to take to the airwaves and lavish praise on her leader
     
  226.  
    1622:

    Here's some initial press reaction to the speech: The Mirror's Kevin Maguire says it was "very good" but the test will be public not party reaction. Patrick Wintour in The Guardian says the frequent One Nation references were a "bold land grab". The Telegraph's James Kirkup agrees, saying Mr Miliband had sought to "steal the Conservatives' clothes".

     
  227.  
    1625:
    John Reid Former Labour Home Secretary John Reid told the BBC's Daily Politics that he hadn't expected Ed Miliband's speech to be as good as it was
     
  228.  
    1626:

    Almost as unsurprising as the praise from his supporters, here comes the criticism. New Tory party chairman Grant Shapps - who was personally criticised in Ed Miliband's speech - says "Labour isn't learning".

     
  229.  
    1627:

    Mr Shapps says: "He had to show that he had learned from the mistakes that Labour made in office. Instead he failed to back our welfare cap, failed to back our immigration cap and still stands for more spending, more borrowing and more debt - exactly what got us into this mess in the first place."

     
  230.  
    1631:

    "Labour in Scotland has lurched to the right," the SNP's Angus Robertson concludes. "The extraordinary message in Ed Miliband's speech is that Labour now amounts to nothing more than a party of one nation Toryism."

     
  231.  
    1633:

    Ed Miliband "attempted to airbrush out his and Labour's record in power," a Lib Dem spokesman argues. "On taxes, youth unemployment and taking on vested interests, Liberal Democrats in the coalition government are delivering where Labour failed."

     
  232.  
    1635:

    Political editor Joe Murphy tweets a preview of his newspaper's front page: Here's the splash headline that Cameron must be dreading - tonight's Standard pic.twitter.com/V8y30ydc

     
  233.  
    1637:

    So, Ed Miliband has delivered his big speech - but it's not the end of the Labour conference. We're going to wrap up the live coverage for the day now but we'll be back with live coverage of Wednesday at Labour from 9.30am - shadow health secretary Andy Burnham's speech looks set to be the main event of the morning.

     

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