A bad day at the office for Theresa May

Theresa May Image copyright PA

When, a year ago the prime minister spoke to the CBI conference she called on business to save the public's faith in capitalism.

Twelve months on, her political fortunes couldn't be more different. After a day like today she might be more concerned about the public's faith in her government.

A trio of her cabinet ministers is in trouble.

Boris Johnson, for making inaccurate comments about a British woman who is in prison in Iran that could, her local MP fears, see her locked up unfairly for longer.

International Development Secretary Priti Patel is in deep difficulty having given an inaccurate version of a recent visit to Israel.

It's known now that she had a dozen meetings with officials and even the Israeli leader while she was there, without informing the Foreign Office, in what potentially is a significant breach of the rules that govern ministers' behaviour.

And today, one of the country's most senior civil servants has been hearing evidence about the alleged inappropriate behaviour of Theresa May's number two, Damian Green.

We can report tonight the allegations about porn on his computer were raised by the former senior police officer Bob Quick back in 2009.

In an official submission to a Parliamentary committee, Mr Quick wrote: "Mr Green was resisting any attempt by the investigation to view the content of his computers and documents seized from his constituency and parliamentary offices."

(There is bad blood between the two men and Mr Green vehemently denies any allegation of wrong doing.)

But there is an atmosphere around the government right now that everything is going wrong.

One minister says what's happening is "just astonishing", another Tory MP said "if it were Ed Miliband as leader of the opposition they'd be 15 points clear".

Another said "I've never seen anything like it", predicting that the government might even fall apart, precipitating an election next year, Jeremy Corbyn as prime minister and Brexit never coming to pass.

The Westminster rumour mill loves nothing more than to predict drama, even Armageddon.

And it is, of course, always dangerous to predict anything. No one knows what happens next, political calm could yet be restored.

But at the very least this is a bad day at the office for Theresa May and right now, this does not feel like a government in control of events.

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