Brendan Cox says politics was behind Jo's death

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Yesterday, Jo Cox's family watched as the House of Commons, filled with her political friends and colleagues honoured her.

Today, with quiet dignity, her husband Brendan explained why he believes politics was behind her death.

He said: "She was a politician and she had very strong political views and I believe was she killed because of those views.

"I think she died because of them and she would want to stand up for those in death as much as she did in life."

As the referendum debate rages, he told me why she feared for our political culture, not just here in the UK but around the world, detailing her belief that the tone of the debate has echoes of the 1930s, with the public feeling insecure, and politicians willing to exploit that sense.

"He told me she was "very worried and from left and right".

He added: "I think she was very worried that the language was coarsening, that people were being driven to take more extreme positions, that people didn't work with each other as individuals and on issues, it was all much too tribal and unthinking."

But Brendan Cox spoke movingly of his desire not just to protect and build on her political achievements - to but to guard the memories of her as his wife, and the mother of their two young children.

He told me: "Most of all I will remember that she met the world with love and both love for her children, love in her family and also love for people she didn't know.

"She just approached things with a spirit, she wasn't perfect at all you know, but she just wanted to make the world a better place, to contribute, and we love her very much."

Brendan decided to speak out today because he wanted to thank the public for the extraordinary support shown to the family in the last few days.

Tomorrow, friends of hers are planning a day of memorials to remember her around the world, including a major event in London's Trafalgar Square.