Former Scotland rugby player Keri Holdsworth dies after crash

Keri Holdsworth (centre) in action for Scotland Women Keri Holdsworth (centre) won 15 caps for Scotland Women

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Former Scotland rugby international Keri Holdsworth has been named as the driver who died after a car crash in Hartlepool on Friday.

The 36-year-old from Edinburgh suffered serious injuries in the crash between her Renault Clio and a BMW on the A19.

She was taken to the James Cook University Hospital in Middlesbrough but died on Saturday.

Scottish Rugby has paid tribute to the former back-row forward who was working as a physiotherapist.

Ms Holdsworth won 15 caps for her country and went on to work as a physiotherapist with a number of Scotland age-grade squads.

'Fondly remembered'

Paul McGinley, head of performance medical with rugby's national body, said: "On behalf of the medical teams across Scottish Rugby, I'd like to express our deepest sympathies to Keri's family.

"Keri worked to provide care to Scottish Rugby players over a number of years and was an outstanding professional and person.

"Some of our team members knew her as a player, others as a colleague and friend who worked with our Scotland Women's Under-20 squad.

"She was a fantastically upbeat and positive person who will be very sorely missed but very fondly remembered."

Ms Holdsworth, who played for Watsonians at club level, made her Scotland debut in 2008 and played in the 2010 Women's Rugby World Cup.

She continued to work as a physiotherapist for her former club and in a senior role with FASIC Sports Medicine Centre.

Her sister, Fiona Chadwick, described her as a "beloved sister who will be greatly missed" and said that family and friends have been left "devastated by what has happened."

Police at Cleveland and Durham Specialist Operations Unit have appealed for witnesses to the collision on the northbound carriageway at the Dalton Piercy junction.

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