Glasgow 2014: Petition to scrap Team Scotland parade uniform

Textile designer Jilli Blackwood said she was ''very proud'' of the uniform for Team Scotland

A petition to scrap the uniforms to be worn by Team Scotland at the Commonwealth Games opening ceremony has received more than 18,000 signatures.

The controversial outfits, designed by textile artist Jilli Blackwood, include turquoise, fuchsia and navy tartan.

The uniform launch immediately sparked comments on Twitter comparing it to "a pair of curtains" or "something a 70s dance troupe would wear".

Now a campaign to have it ditched has spread around the world.

The Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games begin on Wednesday 23 July with a ceremony at Celtic Park during which athletes will wear the parade uniform.

Expat Lorna Gillies backed the change.org petition "to stop the host nation being a laughing stock".

She said: "I'm a Scot living in Australia and this monstrosity of an outfit is an embarrassment to our nation.

"My Australian friends have had a good laugh at it, asking if it's actually a joke.

"They won't be the only other nation laughing.

"Change it and let our athletes wear an outfit they can feel pride in, not embarrassment."

Designer Ms Blackwood defended the uniform saying that "if everyone liked it, I wouldn't be doing my job."

But opponents have left comments including: "Brigadoon theme park comes to mind!"

Ross Laidlaw, of Kelso, said: "They are a complete waste of money.

"The only thing more ridiculous than the fancy dress costumes themselves is the refusal to accept there has been a huge mistake ."

Team Scotland parade uniform The bag worn across the shoulder is intended to represent a half saltire

Leigh Fox, from Nicosia in Cyprus, said: "I've never known a Scotsman to look bad in a kilt - until now!"

And Nick Bryant, of Cleland, Lanarkshire, said: "I'm English and I'm embarrassed by it! Who the hell thought of those colours?"

The men's uniform which has sparked the controversy comprises a blue shirt while a flowing wrap-around dress has been designed for the women.

A shawl-like wrap and stone-coloured leather bag complete the women's uniform, the latter worn diagonally across the front like one half of the St Andrew's Cross.

They were produced by House of Edgar at Keith in Moray.

Hundreds of Team Scotland athletes were in Stirling for the final Team Camp when the outfits were revealed, with pictures being beamed around the world.

Yuseff Ghafor, of Carnoustie, Angus, signed the protest petition within hours of it being launched.

He said: "It's an embarrassing representation of a proud nation."

Rhona Robertson, of Perth, added: "This uniform makes a mockery of our team.

"It's dated-looking and garish in the extreme."

Scott Bowie, of Santa Tomas, California, said: "This colour scheme is sickly. The women look like wee grannies, not athletes."

Some of the athletes taking part in the Games have backed the uniform.

Cyclist Charline Joine said: "It's refreshing and a definite surprise. I was expecting a kilt, but love the fact the girls are in dresses this time as it's more feminine and it's still got the blue of Scotland in it."

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