Scotland

The UK's winter 'weather bomb' in maps

It started with a surf report. On Monday Devon-based website Magicseaweed.com began to warn of swells of up to 40ft (12m).

Image copyright Magicseaweed.com

Dubbed "Black Wednesday", as the storm approached it was identified as a explosive cyclogenesis, known as a "weather bomb".

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Media captionWhat is a weather bomb? BBC weather's Peter Gibbs explains

Throughout Tuesday, Met Office alerts were issued, with amber warnings put in place for parts of Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Image copyright Met office

The swirling low pressure funnelled high winds across the North Atlantic, as wind modelling website earth.nullschool.net showed.

Image copyright earth.nullschool.net

With the winds came gusts topping more than 80mph in some areas and huge waves crashing against the coast.

And meteorologists also recorded intense strikes of lightning across the west.

Despite ferry cancellations and a fishing boat rescue off the north coast, marinetraffic.com showed commercial traffic was still sailing.

Image copyright www.marinetraffic.com

Forecasters had plenty to keep across and warned of wintry and blustery conditions throughout "Black Wednesday" and on into Thursday.

Along with the wind and waves and rain comes the danger of flooding. So here's an interactive map of flood warnings.

Note: the Scottish Environment Protection Agency display their flood alert data differently to the Environment Agency and Natural Resources Wales. While the Environment Agency and Natural Resources Wales highlights individual rivers only, in Scotland the entire region is coloured to indicate the level of alert. This map and flood alert data are supplied to the BBC by third parties. The BBC is not responsible for its accuracy and you use it at your own risk.

Note: the Environment Agency and the Scottish Environment Protection Agency display their flood alert data differently. While the Environment Agency highlights individual rivers only, in Scotland the entire region is coloured to indicate the level of alert.

And back to the bigger picture, the west of Scotland remains in the wake of a "weather bomb" producing the most intense waves on the planet.

Image copyright Magicseaweed.com

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