Scotland

Catholic Church in Scotland reveals abuse allegations

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The Catholic Church in Scotland has revealed details of abuse allegations made in 2013, of which seven were made against members of the clergy.

In total, 15 allegations were made, of which six were historical (from the 1980s or before).

Ten of the allegations were of sexual abuse, of which three also involved physical abuse.

The Catholic Church said it was publishing the audit to show that it was being transparent and open.

The Diocesan Safeguarding Audit for 2013 showed that the remainder of the allegations involved physical abuse alone, emotional abuse and verbal abuse.

Ten of the allegations were reported to the police.

A Catholic Church spokesman said the five which were not reported to the police related to shouting at a group of children, poor boundaries and an abuse of power.

None of these were regarded as illegal actions but required a response from the Diocesan Safeguarding Advisor and Bishop.

'Transparency and openness'

As of November 2014, there were no prosecutions associated with 2013 allegations.

Two of the cases have been reported to the procurator fiscal, two of the alleged perpetrators have died, three have been removed from ministry, one is no longer a volunteer and two outcomes are unknown to the Church.

The Church spokesman said: "The Catholic Church in Scotland seeks to safeguard the welfare of people of all ages who are involved in whatever capacity with the Church and its organisations.

"The publication of this audit is an example of the commitment to transparency and openness made previously by Scotland's Catholic Bishops."

"The external Review of Safeguarding Protocols and Procedures being conducted by Dr. Andrew McLellan will report in 2015 and the Statistical Review of all Historic Cases of Abuse from 1947-2005 will be published at that time also."

He added: "The Catholic Church would support an evidence-based inquiry into abuse in care in Scotland."

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