Scotland

Scotland's papers: 'Evil' pair guilty and system failures

One story dominates Scotland's front pages - the guilty verdict of two women convicted of murdering two-year-old Liam Fee. The Scotsman says a number of people had expressed concern about the child's health and wellbeing during his short life.

The Herald says social workers are being investigated over the case following admissions the two-year-old "fell off the radar" before being murdered by his mother and her partner.

In the days leading up to his death, Rachel and Nyomi Fee failed to seek proper medical attention for a broken leg and a fractured arm, reports The National.

The Times reports how during their trial the pair had denied killing Liam at their home near Glenrothes in Fife in March 2014 and attempted to blame another boy for the murder.

The Daily Mail reports that a Google search asking "Can wives be in prison together" was carried out at the home of the two women before they battered the two-year-old to death.

The Scottish Daily Express says jurors who delivered the guilty verdict following the seven-week trial at the High Court in Livingston were in tears at the evidence.

Under the headline "Subhuman", the Daily Record reports on some of the disturbing evidence in the case and describes the women as "twisted" and "evil".

The Scottish Sun features the wedding photo of Rachel and Nyomi Fee, which shows Liam in a kilt, and calls the women "monster mums".

In other news, The Herald says a second police probe has been launched into the Glasgow East MP Natalie McGarry over allegations of financial discrepancies at the SNP's Glasgow regional association.

The Times reports how tens of thousands of American tourists were warned yesterday that they are at risk of terrorist attacks across Europe this summer.

The Press and Journal says it is on the verge of an historic move back to the heart of Aberdeen as it is poised to become one of the first tenants to move into the £107m Marischal Square development in the city.

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