Edinburgh, Fife & East Scotland

Sale of art 'untouched' from 1922

The Bass Rock by John Campbell Mitchell
Image caption More than 52 pieces of artwork by John Campbell Mitchell are set to raise £30,000

Work by a Scottish artist which has remained untouched in his Edinburgh house since he died in 1922 is set to be auctioned.

More than 52 pieces of artwork by John Campbell Mitchell are set to raise £30,000 when they go under the hammer at Bonhams in Edinburgh on 14 October.

Two generations of the family have since occupied the house in the west of the city where he had his studio.

Mitchell was born in Argyll in 1862 but spent most of his life in Edinburgh.

He was a prolific landscape artist in the Scottish Impressionist tradition and noted for his fresh, atmospheric approach and mastery of light.

Home turf

He built a collection of works by his friends and contemporaries such as Charles Mackie, Robert Noble and artist Robert Burns, whose work also feature in the sale.

Chris Brickley, head of pictures for Bonhams Scotland, said: "Mitchell is one of Scotland's more original landscape painters, exhibiting prolifically from 1886 until his death in 1922.

"He is a classic example of a British Impressionism artist working en plein air to produce light, atmospheric oils with big skies.

"His favoured sketching grounds included his home turf of the Argyll coast, Dumfriesshire and Moray.

"It's remarkable to think this studio has survived intact and I expect bidders to respond to these accomplished and fresh-looking pictures."

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