Leigh Griffiths faces disciplinary action over racist Twitter comment

Leigh Griffiths Leigh Griffiths is on loan from Wolves

Related Stories

Hibernian striker Leigh Griffiths is facing disciplinary action over a racist comment on Twitter.

In response to a tweet, Griffiths told user Zak Iqbal to go "back to your own country".

The player - who is on loan from Wolves - later apologised for the tweet, which he admitted was "out of order".

Hibs said the player realised that "despite the provocation", his language had been "unacceptable". Wolves said they were "angry and disappointed".

Lothian and Borders Police said they had been made aware of the matter and were carrying out initial inquiries.

Griffiths - a Scotland international - has now restricted access to his Twitter account, which has almost 13,000 followers.

'Extremely angry'

In a statement, Hibs said: "The player supports the club and the whole of Scottish football in its stance against racism, bigotry and anti social behaviour.

"The player will be subject to a disciplinary process which will be a private matter between the club and the player."

A Wolves spokesman said: "Wolves are aware of an alleged racist comment made on Twitter last night by Leigh Griffiths.

"The club condemns such comments in the strongest possible terms and are extremely angry and disappointed.

"The player is currently on loan at Hibernian FC and is likely to remain there for the rest of the season.

"He is, therefore, subject to the disciplinary procedures of Hibernian FC and those of the Scottish Football Association.

"However, Wolves are in dialogue with Hibernian and are making their feelings known on the matter."

More on This Story

Related Stories

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

BBC Edinburgh, Fife and East

Weather

Edinburgh

6 °C 5 °C

Features & Analysis

Elsewhere on the BBC

  • FordFactory facelift

    Watch as the plant that makes Ford's legendary F-150 undergoes a total overhaul

Programmes

  • A prosthetic legClick Watch

    How motion capture technology is being used to design bespoke prosthetics

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.