Edinburgh, Fife & East Scotland

Death announced of young disabled poet Adam Bojelian

Adam Bojelian with his mother, Zoe Picton Image copyright bbc

An Edinburgh boy who wrote poetry by blinking after being paralysed as an infant has died.

Adam Bojelian, who was blind and had cerebral palsy, won a global audience for his poems published online.

His mother Zoe announced that the 15-year-old had passed away by posting a photo on Twitter with the hashtag #braveadam.

Hundreds of people have posted tributes on Adam's Twitter page.

Adam has previously won a Brit Writers' Award and a Blue Peter Gold Badge for his poetry, which he wrote using special computer software.


By Pauline McLean, BBC Scotland arts correspondent

I first met Adam Bojelian at the Edinburgh International Book Festival.

Although cerebral palsy had deprived him of his sight and movement he wasn't letting that get in the way of a question to his favourite author. It was a painstaking process of blinking letters to his mum but Adam was nothing if not determined.

We met again on Twitter where I discovered he was already a published poet. At the age of 11!

If Twitter is sometimes berated as a shallow place of shrill shouting, it was also the window to the world for Adam.

As Ads the Poet, he could communicate quickly and easily.

It revealed a boy with a sense of humour and quick wit.

His "hee hees" were a familiar response as he shared his views and poems and chatted with journalists, MSPs, actors, campaigners and other children.

He was outspoken and passionate. Political when it came to his campaign for mainstream education and care.

Adam was a lovely, gentle genuine voice amid the vacuous din. And one day to my sadness, I realised his voice was no longer there.

He touched so many lives in his 15 short years. Despite his own challenges, he frequently raised money for others.

His final wish was to raise funds for UK Sepsis Trust and his mother Zoe has a donation page set up.

But above all, he raised hope. And never allowed anyone to write him off.

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