Edinburgh, Fife & East Scotland

Edinburgh Airport consultation launched on flight paths

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Media captionA previous trial of a new flight path brought complaints about increased noise

Edinburgh Airport has launched a major consultation into new flight paths.

It said new flight paths would allow it to maintain safe and sustainable growth without affecting punctuality.

An earlier trial of an alternative route pattern for aircraft using the airport was ended early, in October 2015, after complaints about noise.

A publicity campaign about proposed flight path changes will feature a television advert, online information and 600,000 leaflets.

The consultation will last for 14 weeks.

Image caption The consultation documents show a number of flight paths which could be used by departing aircraft

Airport chief executive Gordon Dewar said any proposed changes to flight paths would be looked at carefully.

He said: "I think any change means that inevitably we have change to the impact. Sometimes that's an improvement for people and sometimes it's not, unfortunately.

"But what we want to make sure is we understand that when we're looking at the options in the second stage of the process that we're putting the balance on the really important growth agenda for Scotland and then making sure that we're being sensitive and looking after those that we can in the community."

Helena Paul, of the campaign Edinburgh Airport Watch, said she viewed the proposed changes with "absolute horror".

'No need for change'

She told BBC Radio Scotland: "I wouldn't wish the noise levels that we're now suffering on anyone.

"I was woken again at six o'clock this morning by a plane going over. The last plane went over about quarter to 12 last night. I wouldn't wish that on any community.

"Edinburgh Airport has had established flight routes for 40 years...they do not need to change their flight paths to be able to increase their capacity."

Any proposal to alter flight paths at Edinburgh Airport would have to be approved by the Civil Aviation Authority.

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