Wind link to Colin McRae helicopter crash

Clockwise from left, Colin McRae, Johnny McRae, Ben Porcelli and Graeme Duncan Clockwise from left, Mr McRae, his son Johnny, Ben Porcelli and Graeme Duncan died in the crash

Related Stories

Wind "probably" caused difficulties for a helicopter piloted by Colin McRae which crashed killing all on board, a fatal accident inquiry has heard.

Civil engineer Donald Cook, 54, told the inquiry at Lanark Sheriff Court there was no sign of engine problems when he saw the aircraft.

The helicopter crashed near Mr McRae's home in Lanark in September 2007.

The 39-year-old died along with his five-year-old son Johnny, Ben Porcelli, six, and 37-year-old Graeme Duncan.

Mr Cook told the court that he was out walking his dog near Lee Castle in Lanark when he spotted the aircraft flying low.

The witness said he was familiar with helicopters through his work and they tended to attract his attention as a result.

'Engine fine'

He said: "I also noticed it was at a relatively low height. It's difficult to determine height accurately, it was maybe three or four hundred feet, quite a bit lower than helicopters would normally fly at."

Mr Cook said he saw news of the helicopter crash later that day, which contained suggestions of engine problems and erratic flying.

But the witness told the court there was no sign of engine problems at the point when he saw the helicopter.

"The engine was fine," he told the inquiry.

He also told the court: "I do remember it was quite a windy day. I thought, the guy's probably having difficulty flying in that condition."

The inquiry into the crash, which is expected to last several months, entered its fifth day on Friday at Lanark Sheriff Court.

More on This Story

Related Stories

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

BBC Glasgow & West

Weather

Glasgow

22 °C 13 °C

Features & Analysis

  • SyedTanks instead of toys

    Lyse Doucet on the plight of children in Syria and Gaza


  • Silhouette of manSuper-shy

    Why do Germany's super-rich so often keep their heads down?


  • Children playing in Seoul fountainDay in pictures

    The best news photos from around the world in the past 24 hours


  • Gin drinkerMother's ruin

    The time when gin was full of sulphuric acid and turpentine


Elsewhere on the BBC

  • EscaladeBling's the thing

    The ostentatious Cadillac Escalade cruises into 2015 with fuel-gulping gusto

Programmes

  • The smartphones of shoppers being tracked in a storeClick Watch

    How free wi-fi can enable businesses to track our movements and learn more about us

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.