Police officer dies in shooting at Baird Street station in Glasgow

PC Rod Gellatly PC Gellatly died following the incident at Baird Street police station

A police officer who died in a shooting at a police station in Glasgow has been named.

PC Rod Gellatly, 41, an officer with Strathclyde Police, died following a firearms incident at Baird Street police station in the city.

It is believed that he was the only person involved in the incident on Monday. His family has been informed.

An investigation into the circumstances is under way and a report will be submitted to the procurator fiscal.

Officers from another force, Lothian and Borders, have been appointed to oversee the investigation.

An ambulance was called to the police station, in the north of Glasgow, at about 11:00.

'Great sadness'

Asst Ch Con Bernard Higgins said: "It is with great sadness that I confirm a serving Strathclyde Police officer died today in an incident where a firearm was discharged at Baird Street police office.

Policeman at Baird street An ambulance was called to the police station on Monday morning

"Our thoughts are with the officer's family and friends at this difficult time."

Brian Docherty, chairman of the Scottish Police Federation, said: "We can confirm that one of our colleagues has died following a firearms incident in Baird Street police station this morning.

"It is too early to speculate as to the circumstances surrounding the tragic death and our thoughts turn immediately to his family who have lost their loved one and colleagues who have lost a friend."

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