Glasgow Airport in £10m upgrade for Commonwealth Games

Glasgow International Airport Glasgow Airport is expected to deal with thousands of extra passengers during the Commonwealth Games

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The operators of Glasgow Airport have announced that £10m of investment will be brought forward in the run-up to the Commonwealth Games.

The money, which will be added to £7m of planned spending, will be used to improve areas like the international arrivals hall and the check-in area.

Glasgow will host 6,000 athletes as well as thousands of visitors for the Games which open in July 2014.

Glasgow Airport estimated it would invest £200m in the 10 years to 2021.

Around 7m passengers use the terminal each year.

Other areas of investment will include the new lighting for the air-side taxi ways, as well as upgrades to the terminal toilet facilities.

Amanda McMillan, managing director of Glasgow Airport, said: "The eyes of the world will fall on Glasgow during 2014 and we fully recognise the important role we have to play in helping deliver a successful and memorable Commonwealth Games.

"We see ourselves as being the gateway to the games and not only will this significant investment ensure we continue to provide high quality facilities for passengers, it will help create a lasting legacy for Glasgow Airport and the city."

Work is expected to start in October 2013 following the peak summer period.

Glasgow, Edinburgh and Prestwick airports were all identified by the organisers as transport hubs for those coming to Scotland for the 2014 Games.

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