Glasgow & West Scotland

Two men face trial over Glasgow primary school shooting

High Court in Glasgow
Image caption The men had not guilty pleas entered on their behalf at the High Court in Glasgow

Two men allegedly part of an organised crime gang are to stand trial accused of shooting a man outside a Glasgow primary school.

Martyn Fitzsimmons and Mark Richardson are charged with attempting to murder Ross Monaghan at St George's Primary School in Penilee on 16 January.

They are among nine men who will stand trial charged with a five-year campaign of serious organised crime.

Some of the claims relate to £1.5m of "hidden money".

Several of the men are also alleged to have been involved in the supply of cocaine and the possession of submachine guns.

The allegations feature three shootings, including a man being driven more than 200 miles before being shot in the legs.

David Sell, 49, Barry O'Neill, 37, Anthony Woods, 44, Francis Mulligan, 41, Michael Bowman, 30, Mark Richardson, 30, Gerard Docherty, 42, Steven McArdle, 33, and Martyn Fitzsimmons, 36, faced the claims at the High Court in Glasgow on Thursday.

The indictment lists 28 charges spanning between December 2011 and February this year.

'Counter-surveillance equipment'

A number of locations across Scotland, including Glasgow and West Lothian as well as the north of England, are listed.

All nine men first face a charge that, along with named individuals, they did agree with each other to "commit and organise the commission of serious offences".

The allegation then details a string of claims.

This includes an accusation of "concealed hides" being constructed in premises and vehicles to store items such as cash, firearms, phones and laptops.

Prosecutors further claim there was possession of anti and counter-surveillance equipment designed to "thwart" police "investigation techniques".

There is also the alleged use of false names and addresses with appearances disguised using "corporate uniforms, wigs and false facial hair".

Mr Fitzsimmons and Mr Richardson go on to face a separate charge of attempting to murder Ross Monaghan at St George's Primary School Glasgow in January this year.

It is claimed a firearm was discharged and that Mr Monaghan was struck on the body with a bullet.

'Chains and padlocks'

Mr Richardson along with Mr Docherty and Mr McArdle are accused - while masked - of trying to kill Robert Kelbie by shooting him last September in Newbridge, Midlothian.

Mr Sell, Mr O'Neill and Mr Mulligan - again with others named - face a charge of the abduction and attempted murder of Robert Allan in March 2015.

The accusations include claims Mr Allanwas restrained with cable ties, chains and padlocks at a house in Barnsley, South Yorkshire.

Mr Allan is said to have been forced into a car and driven more than 200 miles to an industrial estate in Fauldhouse, West Lothian.

Among other claims, it is alleged he was assaulted and left with a broken leg before being driven "against his will" to East Kilbride, South Lanarkshire.

The indictment states he was then dragged from the car, pinned down and repeatedly shot in the legs.

Mr Sell, Mr O'Neill and Mr Mulligan are also charged with attempting to defeat the ends of justice to "conceal" their alleged guilt.

This includes an accusation that they made Mr Allan undress and then sprayed him with bleach and a pressure washer.

'Criminal property'

The men - apart from Mr Docherty and Mr McArdle - further face a charge under the Proceeds of Crime Act that they did "conceal and disguise criminal property".

This is said to be £1.54m, a further £30,580, as well as 116,450 euros.

It is alleged to have been hidden in a number of places including "concealed compartments" of a lorry listed as being found in East Kilbride.

The nine were also allegedly concerned in the supply of cocaine.

They finally face a number of firearms charges.

Prosecutors list possession of a number of weapons such as submachine guns, Beretta pistols and a Glock handgun.

Lawyers for the nine pled not guilty on their behalf.

Judge Lord Beckett set a trial due to start in November. The case may last about three months.

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