Highlands & Islands

New phase in A9 Perth to Inverness dualling project

Media playback is unsupported on your device
Media captionA visualisation of one of 15 options for the new junction

The next stage in a £3bn project to dual the A9 between Perth and Inverness has begun with a public consultation on the stretch at Dalwhinnie.

Cabinet Secretary for Infrastructure, Investment and Cities Keith Brown has unveiled plans for a new junction giving access to the Highland village.

The public have been asked for their views on 15 options for the junction.

A number of high definition videos of the proposed junction have been created of some of the proposals.

Mr Brown has described the dualling project as "mammoth".

He said: "We are making good headway with the dualling programme, and I have seen for myself the 15 impressive design options being considered for junctions as part of the design work to dual the A9 at Dalwhinnie, giving the local community a series of early options to consider.

"I was particularly impressed with the fly-through images which give road users a real sense of what the new upgraded road could look like and how local access onto and around the A9 might work."

Image copyright CH2MHill Fairhurst
Image caption Public views are being sought on the planned junction

Mr Brown added: "These are key considerations as we take forward plans and, as consultation is at the heart of the A9 dualling programme, we would like the community's thoughts as we narrow down the options to be taken to the next phase of development.

"As well as public exhibitions, we will also be hosting a series of drop-in sessions where the public can come along and meet with the design consultants on a one-to-one basis."

Plans to make the A9 a dual carriageway on all remaining single carriageway sections between Perth and Inverness are ahead of schedule with new sections of the road set to be ready for dualling by 2017.

The work is the biggest transport project undertaken so far in Scotland and will cost £3bn by its completion in 2025.

More on this story

Related Internet links

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites