NE Scotland, Orkney & Shetland

Malcolm Webster: Wife murder plot husband to learn fate

Claire Morris and Malcolm Webster
Image caption A jury ruled Claire Morris was murdered by Malcolm Webster

A man who murdered his first wife and tried to kill his second, both for life assurance money, is set to learn his fate.

Former nurse Malcolm Webster, 52, was earlier found guilty of murdering Claire Morris in an Aberdeenshire crash in 1994.

Webster, from Surrey, had also denied attempting to kill Felicity Drumm in New Zealand in 1999.

He is set to be sentenced at the High Court in Edinburgh.

The hearing was due to take place at 0930 BST, but has been delayed as Webster's prison van was caught in traffic after a fatal crash on the M8 between Glasgow and Edinburgh.

Webster was found guilty in May after Scotland's longest-lasting single accused criminal trial, which began on 1 February at the High Court in Glasgow.

The jury, of nine women and six men, took less than four hours to find Webster guilty of all the charges, as part of frauds to obtain hundreds of thousands of pounds in life assurance.

The fatal crash in 1994, in which Ms Morris died, was originally treated as a tragic accident.

Webster said he had swerved to avoid a motorcyclist.

However, the crash was later reinvestigated, after concerns were raised in the wake of the second crash, in Auckland.

New tests showed Ms Morris had traces of drugs in her system.

Webster, of Guildford, was also found guilty of intending to bigamously marry Simone Banarjee, from Oban, Argyll, to gain access to her estate.

He pretended to have leukaemia, and during the deception he shaved his head and eyebrows.

Ms Morris's family have described Webster as a "monster".

'Taken from society'

Her brother, Peter Morris, told BBC Scotland: "I believe that the minimum sentence he should receive should be 30 years.

"It's more important that he's taken from society because of the damage he can cause to women.

"I would hate for that to happen to anyone else."

Meanwhile, police are also investigating concerns over the deaths of three children at a hospital in Abu Dhabi where Webster worked in the 1980s.

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