Malcolm Webster case: Conviction 'should be quashed'

Claire Morris and Malcolm Webster Claire Morris died in 1994 after a crash involving her husband Malcolm Webster

A man found guilty of murdering his wife in a car crash in Aberdeenshire was the victim of a miscarriage of justice and should have his conviction quashed, appeal judges have been told.

Malcolm Webster, 54, was jailed for a minimum of 30 years for murdering Claire Morris in 1994.

He was also convicted of staging a similar attempt to murder his second wife in New Zealand.

Webster, from Surrey, maintains his innocence.

The appeal hearing is taking place in Edinburgh.

Webster's defence counsel, Gary Allan QC, said the approach of the Crown was "ill-founded" and that close examination of the available evidence failed to show the connection between the alleged crimes in time, character and circumstances.

He said the attempted murder allegation took place four years and nine months later on the other side of the world and in dissimilar circumstances.

The hearing before Lord Eassie, sitting with Lady Clark of Calton and Lord Wheatley, continues.

Webster was found guilty in 2011 of murdering Ms Morris, 32, who was originally from Kent, in a faked car crash.

The jury at the High Court in Glasgow accepted that he set fire to the vehicle with his unconscious wife inside it, before later receiving an insurance payout.

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