How did our people's panel vote in the referendum?

Almost a year ago the BBC gathered together a group of voters from villages, towns and cities across Scotland.

Some planned to vote "Yes", others were backing a "No" vote, and a group of 10 remained undecided.

On Thursday they went to the polls, along with the rest of the country, to decide the question: "Should Scotland be an independent country?"

We caught up with them after they had voted to find out which box they had put their 'X' in.

Referendum ballot paper

Panel members

Name How I voted Name How I voted

Alex Arthur

Alex Arthur

Yes

"I'm not a nationalist but I think that there was a possibility that Scotland would turn out to be a more joined-up kind of society where everybody feels that it's somewhere where they belong. I wasn't necessarily convinced we would be richer.

I hoped that if we tried independence, we would either be a good or a bad example - either it would work or it wouldn't and I wasn't sure we would be any worse off than if we stayed in the UK."

Lynda Forde

Lynda Forde

No

"I just felt that being part of the United Kingdom was better for Scotland.

Personally because much of my working life is spent in England, I felt for me it was better for Scotland not to become an independent country.

I also felt to set up Scotland as an independent country there would have to be a lot of money upfront and it's going to be the taxpayers that are going to be hit in the pocket."

Tracy Metcalfe

Tracy Metcalfe

Yes

"My reasons for supporting Yes were always the same.

I thought Scotland had got the resources and utilities to do it on their own.

Scotland has such amazing resources and tourism as well as the oil. Other small countries do it on their own so I thought that there was no reason why we couldn't as well."

Audrey Birt

Audrey Birt

Yes

"I voted Yes because it was an opportunity to have our own power in our own hands. We could have created an equal, fair and just society where we could invest in our people and not in nuclear weapons. It was also about democracy really - getting the government that you voted for. I'm a member of Women for Independence so I was wandering round the streets checking that people had voted."

John Docherty

John Docherty

No

"It was mostly the uncertainty. There was no sort of concrete guarantee.

I would love to have voted for independence for Scotland but I would have needed to be convinced. 'Ifs', 'buts' and 'maybes' don't pay your mortgage, and I think the discussions they were having the last few weeks, they should have been having two or three years ago.

It was a big decision for this country and it was right that it wasn't taken lightly."

Ronnie Eunson

Ronnie Eunson

Yes

"The more the campaign went on the clearer it was in my mind how I would vote.

"I wasn't impressed by the last minute offer of further powers. I don't think it will happen and I don't think there's any justification to believe the Tory backbenchers will allow it to happen.

I believed a Yes vote would make a more secure future for my grandchildren.

I was at the count in Shetland, and there was certainly an increase in turnout. I think it's been much more positive and constructive than the devolution referendum."

Hal Osler

Hal Osler

No

"I just didn't think independence was a good idea at the moment. They didn't have the figures, they hadn't had the conversations, there wasn't enough certainty - we had no currency, businesses were leaving. There weren't any assurances that all this could be sorted out.

I couldn't actually see the point in voting for independence. We were going to keep the pound, we were going to keep the Queen, we were still going to share defence - so what was independence for? I felt that we were losing more and all we were doing was alienating people."

Melissa Gillen

Lisa Gillen

Yes

"I voted Yes because regardless of how Scotland votes in a general election we will never have our say because there are just over five million people in Scotland and 53 million people in England, so Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales combined won't make a positive difference in any general election. That's one of the main reasons I decided to vote Yes. I believed the NHS had got a better chance under independence. Our education system is one of the best in the world, and so I wanted to preserve that for my children as well."

Naomi Stirrat

Naomi Stirrat

Yes

"Despite all my studying of both sides, I was still undecided when I woke up on Thursday morning. I wanted to vote Yes, but felt concerned about the uncertainty of what would come about following negotiations, but I decided I didn't want to look back in 20 years and regret letting fear drive my vote.

Scotland will flourish as a result of her people's passion, care and sense of responsibility for the referendum."

Paul Welsh

Paul Welsh

Yes

"My vote wasn't a selfish choice.

"I was thinking about what was best for our country in generations to come.

I have a strong belief in the ability of the Scottish people to govern themselves, rather than Westminster.

I have been upset by the scare tactics from Westminster over the last few weeks.

I thought that was pretty poor."

Ballot papers

Panel members

Name How I voted Name How I voted

Ron Greer

Ron Greer

Yes

"The negativity of the No campaign and threats from big businesses reinforced my decision. I don't like being threatened.

I'll believe Scotland will be granted extra powers when I see it. They will either renege on them or Westminster backbenchers will make them renege on it. I believe in the true potential of Scotland. I think we're well resourced relative to our population size and I think we could have had a really modern dynamic country with a very high standard of living."

Murdo MacLennan

Murdo MacLennan

No

"I think the economic uncertainty was the main aspect for me.

Where we are in Stornoway on the Western Isles the attitude over the past number of years has been to centralise powers in Edinburgh and withdraw from the Highlands and Islands. There was nothing in the campaign literature that really promised anything materially different from that.

That was a real concern."

James Budge

James Budge

No

"The Yes campaign were full of promises with nothing to back them up. They would trot out huge amounts of projected facts and figures.

I have been concerned whether talk of Scotland's financial situation stacks up.

I've been completely fed up with the campaign over the last number of weeks."

Jack Lawson

Jack Lawson

No

"There has been no change in my feelings over the whole campaign.

That said, I thought the Yes campaign was better over the last weeks, and connected with people more. Better Together were a bit slow off the mark to point out the problems and the risks.

I think the Westminster parties were a bit late in coming up with extra powers."

Rona MacDonald

Rona MacDonald

The BBC has been unable to get an update at this time.

Angus MacDonald

Angus MacDonald

Yes

"I voted Yes for the future of the people that come after me. My thoughts were 'things can't get any worse than they are now'.

When I asked some of my friends why they were voting No they couldn't tell me.

I was following what the campaigns were up to on the computer, and I wasn't very convinced by the No campaign.

Alex Salmond is an astute politician. Either way he'd won because he got the Westminster politicians offering things that they should have been offering years ago."

Kenneth Hutcheon

Kenneth Hutcheon

No

"My reasons were essentially economic. I didn't feel that Scotland would have the monetary backing to withstand the prices from the national markets if it was independent.

You could see that from the way the stock market reacted to the possibility of a Yes vote, and now that it's a No vote the stock markets have gone back up again. I didn't feel Scotland had the ability to withstand those pressures internationally.

I think now there is obvious call for real change. The Westminster politicians can't be seen to be dragging their feet in any way."

Ann Maxwell

Contributor-Ann Maxwell

No

"My reasons were primarily to do with the economics and the lack of answers.

I run a Scottish-registered charity that provides support and is supported by the whole of the UK, and my personal ambitions for the charity would have been quite threatened by a Yes vote. We get far more financial support from the rest of the UK than from Scotland, and in the event that Scotland had become independent I think there was a very real risk that we would have lost a lot of that. Our collaborative research with the Neuroscience science at Edinburgh University would also have been in jeopardy."

Connor McSharry

Connor McSharry

Yes

"I don't feel very represented by Westminster, and I don't think it really reflects the views of people in Scotland.

I don't like Scotland having nuclear weapons and I thought that a country with five and a half million people could run its affairs much more efficiently than a big country with 60 million.

I felt that my vote would count far more in a smaller country and I didn't think that there would be the kind of isolation that people said there would be."

Kim Simpson

Kim Simpson

Yes

"I was leaning towards Yes a few months ago because much of the stuff that I read was very positive, and the more I read about it and talked about it I just thought it was the right thing to do.

My main reason for voting Yes were that there are no guarantees, either with independence or without. But with independence my vote would actually matter and I would have had more influence at that level than I do as part of the UK."

A rogue ballot paper

Panel members

Name How I voted Name How I voted

Inga Zaiceva

Inga Zaiceva

Yes

"Although I am from Lithuania, I am very proud of Scotland and felt voting Yes was the right thing to do.

Scotland is one of the wealthiest nations so I was hoping for a better education for my children, and better social care for the elderly.

I was 100% positive about independence and was hoping for something new and that things would get better.

The Westminster parties were threatening all the time, and now I think things might be even worse because they might think they can interfere in Scotland's affairs now. The fact that it was 45% for Yes, shows that Scotland wants change."

Lindsay Neil

Lindsay Neil

Yes

"My reasons for voting Yes were reinforced during the various debates and how the campaigns were organised in latter stages.

I was struck by the rudeness of some of the No politicians, and I found the No campaign very upsetting.

I'm very surprised that so many of the old folk believed their pensions were at risk when of course they were not. A large proportion of the over 65s voted No because of that and I feel they were misled.

It's unfortunate that Alex Salmond has resigned, and now we're hearing that some of the promises given might not be fulfilled.

I'm feeling quite despondent. I think there's trouble ahead."

Deirdre Henderson

Deirdre Henderson

The BBC has been unable to get an update at this time.

Ranbir Patwal

Ranbir Patwal

No

"I see Scotland, England, Wales and Northern Ireland as states a bit like the United States and each state having substantial powers individually. I think that's the way forward rather than totally dissecting us as a country.

The UK government should pay more attention to the other devolved governments. That's why there has been resentment. Hopefully with more powers this won't be a problem.

More powers would give Scotland independence without having to go independent on their own."

Jamie Robertson

Jamie Robertson

The BBC has been unable to get an update at this time.

Denzel Darku

Denzel Darku

The BBC has been unable to get an update at this time.

Ian Kinghorn

Ian Kinghorn

The BBC has been unable to get an update at this time.

Catt Weir

Catt Weir

The BBC has been unable to get an update at this time.

Fergus Hardie

Fergus Hardie

The BBC has been unable to get an update at this time.

John Mercer

John Mercer

The BBC has been unable to get an update at this time.

"

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