Historic Scone Palace archway destroyed by contractor

Scone Palace archways The arch had formed the approach to the Augustinian Abbey at the palace

Related Stories

An ancient archway at Scone Palace in Perthshire has been destroyed after a van crashed into it.

The historic 16th Century arch, which marked the spot of an Augustinian Abbey that once stood on the site, was hit by the van being driven by a contractor.

Officials at the palace said they were "devastated" by the accident and said conservationists were set to visit.

It is understood the contractor was on site to remove a marquee used at an event over the weekend.

Suzanne Urquhart, chief executive at Mansfield Estates said: "We were notified of the accident shortly before 1pm today and took immediate steps to make the area around the archway safe.

"We are currently taking advice from Historic Scotland and have arranged for conservation architects to examine what remains of the archway as soon as is practical, with a view to undertaking a reconstruction project in the longer term.

"Clearly we are devastated that such a priceless monument and important piece of Scottish history has been destroyed in this manner, however we are thankful that neither the driver nor any member of the public was injured".

Scone Palace is best-known as the place where former kings of Scotland were crowned and the original home of the Stone of Destiny.

Public access to the palace and its grounds remains unaffected by the incident

More on This Story

Related Stories

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

BBC Tayside & Central

Weather

Dundee

20 °C 13 °C

Features & Analysis

Elsewhere on the BBC

  • StuntmanStuntman to the stars

    Driving dangerously and falling off buildings are all part of the day job for Bobby Holland Hanton

Programmes

  • The smartphones of shoppers being tracked in a storeClick Watch

    How free wi-fi can enable businesses to track our movements and learn more about us

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.