TV director repeats drink driving offence

Peter Barber-Fleming leaves Stirling Sheriff Court Peter Barber-Fleming will be sentenced at Stirling Sheriff Court on 9 October

A man who directed a string of popular television programmes, including the Bill and Poirot, has been convicted of drinking and driving for a fourth time.

Peter Barber-Fleming, 60, from Dunblane, admitted driving with no insurance or licence after being banned from driving in 2012 for five years.

He was caught behind the wheel of his Saab 9-3 convertible on 17 August on the B8033 Kinbuck to Braco Road.

Stirling Sheriff Mark Stewart delayed sentence until 9 October.

The court heard that Barber-Fleming, who also worked on shows including Taggart, Mortimer's Law and Casualty, was more than twice the legal alcohol limit when stopped.

'Worrying pattern'

After avoiding a prison sentence in March 2012 for driving while over the limit, he had said: "I won't be driving again. I know I put people at risk, this could ruin my career."

However, the award winning programme-maker, who is also an honorary professor at the University of Stirling, was back in the city's sheriff court on Friday.

His solicitor, Colin Dunipace, said: "He pleads guilty. My Lord will see a certain pattern to the offending.

"I think this is a case where background reports will be needed. He is under a period of disqualification."

Sheriff Stewart said: "I see he is disqualified for five years.

"You will understand that the previous convictions and the current complaint are starting to show a worrying pattern in relation to your driving and your drinking.

"In those circumstances I will obtain a report to tell about your background, which will include your drinking.

"I will defer sentence."

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