Wales

No public money for royal wedding urges Plaid Cymru AM

Commemorative plates and mugs celebrating the engagement of Prince William and Kate Middleton being prepared at the Aynsley China works in Longton near Stoke-on-Trent
Image caption Kirsty Williams said the wedding could bring an economic boost in certain areas

Public money should not be used to pay for next year's Royal Wedding, a Plaid Cymru assembly member has said.

Mid and West Wales AM Nerys Evans, told BBC One's Question Time it would be particularly wrong in the current economic climate.

First Minister Carwyn Jones told the programme Prince William and Kate Middleton's the wedding should be a "celebration and not a procession".

He said care should be taken on how it was planned and paid for.

Both were speaking on the programme, which was broadcast from Swansea.

'Price worth paying'

Ms Evans added that the response to the announcement of the royal engagement was "the same old hysteria".

Image caption Plaid Cymru AM Nerys Evans said public money should not be spent on royal wedding.

She said ordinary people were not walking around with smiles on their faces after hearing the news and she did not want a single penny of public money spent on the wedding.

Ms Evans added that it was wrong for the taxpayer to have to provide £1.4m of additional security for Prince William because of his decision not to live on the base at RAF Valley on Anglesey.

Prince William is a member of helicopter crew with the RAF's search and rescue service.

He and Miss Middleton, who met at university, announced their engagement earlier this week.

The policing bill for the wedding - to provide security for the public and guests who could include world leaders and royalty from across the globe - could run into tens of millions of pounds.

'Reinvent itself'

But a St James' Palace spokesman has already stressed the prince, who is second in line to the throne, and his bride-to-be were conscious of the country's economic situation.

BBC royal correspondent Nicholas Witchell said Buckingham Palace would want to "send a very definite signal that it is not on the lavish scale of the Charles and Diana wedding of 30 years ago, that it will be a royal wedding suitable and appropriate to the times."

Speaking on Question Time, Conservative UK Employment Minister Chris Grayling insisted the royal wedding would be a "great national occasion", which would boost moral and the economy.

Mr Grayling also said that although security costs would necessarily be attached to the wedding, this was "a price worth paying."

Welsh Lib Dem leader Kirsty Williams told the programme the wedding gave the royal family "a new opportunity to reinvent itself" and it could also give an economic boost in certain areas.

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