Wales

Respects paid on Armistice Day around Wales

  • 11 November 2013
  • From the section Wales

Thousands of people have paid tribute to those who have died in battles since World War One as part of the Armistice commemorations in Wales.

At 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, thousands fell silent for two minutes, 95 years after the guns fell silent along the Western Front.

Military bases, town halls and schools were among those taking part.

Assembly Presiding Officer Rosemary Butler AM led the silence from the Senedd in Cardiff Bay.

In spite of the rain, thousands stood in city and town centre memorials around the Wales.

In Wrexham, a lone bugler played the Last Post followed by an air raid siren to start the tributes.

Meanwhile at Swansea, people gathered at a memorial to merchant seamen and fishermen led by Canon Keith Evans in the main shopping area. They watched sombre commemorations on a large screen.

Cardiff council laid wreaths at a staff memorial at City Hall as a tribute to former workers who lost their lives in battle.

A two-minute silence was also marked across all council buildings and in cities, towns and villages across the country.

Welsh Secretary David Jones struck a £5 Remembrance Day coin at the Royal Mint, Llantrisant, near Cardiff.

The minister took part in a remembrance service at the Royal Mint, which has been at the heart of manufacturing medals for veterans since they were first awarded to individual servicemen following the Battle of Waterloo in 1815.

"The red remembrance poppy has become a familiar emblem of Remembrance Day," Mr Jones said.

"The Remembrance Day coin is also a fitting tribute to those who have given their lives in the service of our country, and our gratitude to our servicemen and women who continue to protect our way of life both at home and overseas."

The commemorations had followed services and parades which had taken place around Wales on Remembrance Sunday with a national event at Cardiff's Welsh National War Memorial.

First Minister Carwyn Jones said the relevance of the remembrance tradition remained "undiminished" with British troops on duty around the world.

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