Welsh libraries and museums get £2.2m cash injection

The Laws of Hywel Dda The Laws of Hywel Dda book has been digitised by the National Library

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The National Library of Wales has been awarded more than £320,000 to develop its online services as part of a £2.2m package for libraries and museums around Wales.

The money will benefit two schemes at the National Library in Aberystwyth.

A further £1m will help modernise nine libraries elsewhere.

A mobile library service in Ceredigion and a project which involves making archives more accessible has also won funding.

The £321,000 National Library of Wales grant will be used to deliver and provide online resources including newspapers, the Welshlibraries.org portal and a cross-catalogue search facility.

Libraries to be modernised

  • Llandrindod Wells, Powys: £180,000
  • Pontardawe, Neath Port Talbot: £171,394
  • Llantwit Major, Vale of Glamorgan: £120,000
  • Aberfan, near Merthyr £120,000
  • Pennard, Swansea: £118,585
  • Ceredigion (mobile): £90,410
  • Ely, Cardiff (Jasmine Centre): £80.000
  • Grangetown, Cardiff: £80,000
  • Pembroke Dock: £24,300

Source: Welsh government

It will also facilitate the Aberystwyth-based institution to buy online family history resources for libraries, archives and accredited museums.

The library's chief executive and librarian, Aled Gruffydd Jones, said: "Additional funding such as this will allow for the continued enhancement of the library's key services enabling future users in Wales from all walks of life to enjoy improved forms of access to publicly-funded information and knowledge."

Nearly £1m will also be used to modernise nine libraries across Wales.

Minister for Culture and Sport John Griffiths said the cash injection would enable local museums, archives and libraries to "develop their services, improve facilities and encourage greater use by the public".

He added: "This welcome investment will help promote our rich culture and heritage and ensure that more people can access and enjoy our collections."

Research revealing the history of steel and steelmaking in Wales at Swansea University has received a major boost thanks to £76,000 of the funding package.

It aims to open up public access to archive collections relating to the steel industry.

"The steel industry has played a key role in the development of Wales and the 'Wales Showing our Metal' project will enable researchers of all ages to understand the legacy of the steel industry and its ongoing impact on Welsh communities," said Mr Griffiths.

"Without the support of archive services and this investment, these records could have been lost to future generations."

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