Wales

Ancient Welsh sites revealed during dry weather

Recent dry weather conditions have revealed a number of prehistoric and Roman sites across Wales.

The discoveries included one prehistoric defended enclosure in Pembrokeshire and another one in Gower.

Toby Driver from the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales said the aerial survey revealed many "surprises".

Work to catalogue and record the discoveries is expected to continue into the winter months.

Image copyright Crown Copyright RCAHMW
Image caption This Iron Age enclosure was seen north of Cardigan
Image copyright Crown Copyright RCAHMW
Image caption Another Iron Age enclosure was seen in Pembrokeshire
Image copyright Crown Copyright RCAHMW
Image caption Hillforts were found near Dale in Pembrokeshire
Image copyright Crown Copyright RCAHMW
Image caption The outline of an enclosure was spotted near Oxwich Castle in Gower
Image copyright Crown Copyright RCAHMW
Image caption The remains of a Roman road were spotted near Whitland, Carmarthenshire

Dr Driver said they had discovered about 20 new Iron Age farm sites in Pembrokeshire this summer, which showed that the county was farmed then almost as intensively as it is today.

He said there were now about 400 Iron Age sites which had been identified in the area.

Among the discoveries was a defended farm from that period which had also been revealed in south Pembrokeshire, next to an oil refinery which had been developed in the 1960s.

"It's absolutely amazing to have found all these Iron Age farms in Pembrokeshire - I think it will lead to some academic research into why there were so many of them," he said.

Related Topics

More on this story

Related Internet links

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites