Powys council issues 'drunk walking' advice for Christmas revellers

A clip from Just a Regular Night Out campaign video The film follows a young reveller and his friends on a drunken night out

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Powys council has issued safety advice to Christmas revellers which includes warning people about the danger of "drunk walking".

The council's road safety unit is behind a video campaign aimed at highlighting the dangers faced by drunk pedestrians in the road.

It is part of the unit's Fatal4Law campaign to reduce road accidents.

The film features a drunk man who is mown down by a van as he stands in the road after a night out.

Start Quote

We want to remind everyone to enjoy and stay safe this Christmas and keep a look out for their mates on a night out ”

End Quote Alyson Broome Powys Council road safety project officer

Called Just a Regular Night Out?, it is being shown on YouTube.

The council said that "as well as the usual messages surrounding anti drink-driving, the council's road safety unit is reminding people drunk walking can also be a problem".

Cllr Barry Thomas, cabinet member responsible for road safety, added: "No one wants to spoil the fun over the Christmas period but consider how it would affect those around you if you were involved in a collision because of the way you were behaving when you were drunk."

Alyson Broome, the council's road safety project officer, said: "We want to remind everyone to enjoy and stay safe this Christmas and keep a look out for their mates on a night out to ensure everyone gets home safely."

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