Tomos Wyn Roberts' Llangefni death: 'Race' drivers jailed

Daniel Owen (left) and Jamie Wyn Williams Daniel Owen (L) and Jamie Wyn Williams were racing each other

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Two drivers who caused the death of a pedestrian while racing each other have been sent to prison.

Daniel Owen, 22, and Jamie Wyn Williams, 19, hit Tomos Wyn Roberts, 22, while he was crossing the road at Llangefni, Anglesey, last November.

Owen received six years and eight months and Williams was given five years.

Judge Niclas Parry, sentencing at Caernarfon Crown Court, said the case showed "the curse of joyriding".

Daniel Owen, formerly of Ty Croes, Anglesey, admitted causing death by dangerous driving, drink-driving and driving while uninsured.

He was also banned from driving for six years and until he passes an extended test.

Start Quote

This has been yet another example of the most wasteful and unnecessary loss of life in north Wales caused by the curse of joy-riding”

End Quote Judge Niclas Parry

When his silver Vauxhall Corsa car struck Mr Roberts, Owen was drink-driving for the second time and his eyes were described as 'bulging out of his head' because he had taken cocaine.

The other driver, Jamie Wyn Williams, had only passed his test three days earlier, the court heard.

He had denied causing death by dangerous driving but was found guilty by a jury following a trial.

Judge Niclas Parry said the victim was a devoted son who doted on his two sisters.

"Tomos Wyn Roberts was a young man of whom a family, workforce and community were justifiably hugely proud.

"He was a natural and accomplished footballer and to his last breath displayed courtesy and kindness.

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We can't find the words to describe the gap he has left in our lives”

End Quote Family of Tomos Wyn Roberts

"That life has been lost, the heart torn out of a family and community because you selfishly and disgracefully decided to use the streets of Llangefni as a racetrack.

"This has been yet another example of the most wasteful and unnecessary loss of life in north Wales caused by the curse of joy-riding."

The judge said Owen was the instigator of tragic events after he made repeated and determined efforts to get Williams to race him.

"In your determination to win the race you drove on the wrong side of the road, over the brow of a blind hill, resulting in the inevitable collision.

"The impact was such it was described as an explosion," said the judge.

The prosecution said the pair had been in an early morning race around the one-way system in the centre of Llangefni and on nearby Glanhwfa Road where Mr Roberts was struck after getting out of a taxi to cross the road.

Prosecutor Sion ap Mihangel said: "They were racing one another in a built-up area.

Tomos Wyn Roberts Tomos Wyn Roberts was a talented footballer

"Mr Roberts was tragically struck by the lead car, a silver Corsa.

"Such was the force of the impact his body flew into the air."

The taxi driver recalled seeing Williams's red Corsa drive underneath Mr Roberts' flying body as it went past.

Mr Roberts died at the scene.

After the court case the family of Mr Roberts, a factory worker, said they were left "distraught and broken-hearted when Tom was killed... a young man of 22 whose life was just at its beginning".

"We can't find the words to describe the gap he has left in our lives."

Mr Roberts' father, Wyn, a hospital porter, and his mother Lian, a teacher, added: "We are just relieved at the outcome of the trial and feel there has been some small justice done for Tom's death.

"Hopefully this case will highlight the dangers of illegal racing and driving under the influence of drink and drugs."

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